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I'm putting in new wood flooring, and, even though I tried to measure as perfectly as I could, the expansion gap on one wall is too wide. It's the wall where each row of planks ends, and the gap is 3/4" to 1" in places, and not uniform. The baseboard we bought is just narrow enough to not cover any of the gap.

I don't really want to use quarter-round (I'm not a fan of built-up moldings), so I'm wondering if there's another way to deal with it. The idea I had was that maybe I could cut slivers of my scrap flooring (~1/2") and stick them at the ends. Since it would be at the very edge of the floor, I'm hoping it wouldn't be that noticeable (less noticeable anyway than having a space between the floor and baseboard).

Any thoughts? Any other ideas? Also, if I do this, how should I secure these pieces? Wood glue against the existing flooring pieces, or just stick them in there loosely? Or do you think quarter-round is my only option?
 

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I'm putting in new wood flooring, and, even though I tried to measure as perfectly as I could, the expansion gap on one wall is too wide. It's the wall where each row of planks ends, and the gap is 3/4" to 1" in places, and not uniform. The baseboard we bought is just narrow enough to not cover any of the gap.

I don't really want to use quarter-round (I'm not a fan of built-up moldings), so I'm wondering if there's another way to deal with it. The idea I had was that maybe I could cut slivers of my scrap flooring (~1/2") and stick them at the ends. Since it would be at the very edge of the floor, I'm hoping it wouldn't be that noticeable (less noticeable anyway than having a space between the floor and baseboard).

Any thoughts? Any other ideas? Also, if I do this, how should I secure these pieces? Wood glue against the existing flooring pieces, or just stick them in there loosely? Or do you think quarter-round is my only option?
this is an easy fix.
Just pass some lengths on a table saw with a guide set for the proper width req'd, don't forget to leave some gap 1/4" min.,
then use a good wood glue (or PL premium) & brad nails to hold it in place while it sets. The baseboard can then be installed without a quarter round.

I agree, I don't like the look of built up mouldings, so there aren't any quarter rounds on my baseboards.

Good luck,
 

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I don't understand the aversion to using a base shoe. That's the way true craftsmen have been finishing homes for over a century when hardwood is used.
 

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I'd do the spacer behind the baseboard
Then trim on top of the baseboard to make it look better
I've never liked the look of quarter round at the bottom of the baseboard
In one room I used quarter round only as baseboard trim
 
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