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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, this very well could turn into an insurance claim. Trying to get a little background information before I go reaching out the insurance adjuster, as this building is "non-conforming" and I'm not sure the city will let me rebuild it due to current zoning/setbacks. It was built 50-70 years ago and lots has changed since then (duh).

Pretty clearly someone hit the building right at the corner. Appears to have pushed "in" (to the left) the wall at the 4th course of cinder blocks. I assume the width of the gap is approximately indicative of the amount the top 3/4 of the wall was pushed in.

So the questions:

A.) I'm sure this is bad, but "how bad" -- i.e. is it in imminent danger of collapse?
B.) I've done very little/no work with cinder block walls. Is there any hope of repairing this corner without totally demo'ing it and starting over? FWWI, the blocks are hollow (i.e. no fill), old, and they seem really soft (I recently drilled a 1" hole in it and it took about 3 seconds to get through with a hammer drill and a good bit)
C.) Assuming the corner cannot be 'repaired', is there a method to rebuild just the corner/two walls, or is the entire building destined for a date with a dumpster?
Road surface Vehicle Asphalt Car Wood

Property Fixture Brickwork Wood Brick

Left side appears ok. The entire building had 'issues' (albeit relatively minor) before this collision event. Broken bonds, day-light coming through the cracks etc. Unfortunately the security camera was not installed before the collision (it was the motivation for it)
Bedrock Wood Wall Font Composite material

I put the broken pieces here for no good reason. Figured it might be good to save them (??). You can see the black 'rub marks' (guessing black enamel/powder-coating from a large truck?)
Wood Flooring Floor Wall Door

Left side of the structure seems basically unaffected
Road surface Asphalt Wood Wall Composite material

Tree Wood Road surface Architecture Door

Amazingly, the garage door still rolls up, though definitely is not as well in alignment as it used to be (that is actually how I first noticed the issue -- it was stiff to roll up). The bond-break two courses down from the top is pretty easy to see in this picture (and of course the gaping ones own below)
Building Tree Plant Wood Door

Automotive tire Wood Grey Snow Road surface

Rectangle Snow Composite material Concrete Road surface

This is an interesting picture. I think that the blocks on the right (actual corner blocks) stayed put, while the left 'middle' block was pushed to the left as it was attached to the block that was actually hit.
Car Vehicle Property Motor vehicle Hood

Pre-collision picture showing the structure as a whole.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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You want the truth, or a fantasy tale?


The building is too small, it is obviously in the wrong place.

It is unsafe to even try to repair that.

Get an insurance adjuster out, and take the money and build a bigger better garage elsewhere on the lot.

ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You want the truth, or a fantasy tale?


The building is too small, it is obviously in the wrong place.

It is unsafe to even try to repair that.

Get an insurance adjuster out, and take the money and build a bigger better garage elsewhere on the lot.

ED
Yes, the truth would be appreciated.

The building was built sometime in the 50's and has served its purpose (and continues to serve "a" purpose). But yes, it is obviously tiny, right on what is now a busy alleyway, and basically a very heavy shed.

(To be fair, it served as a blacksmith shop, and a ceramics studio for 70 years, but yes -- times have changed and it is now obsolete).

Thanks for your input. My 'gut' thinks you are right. Demo'ing it and rebuilding will probably need to happen, its just a difficult time for that to occur for other reasons. Might need to be delayed until fall of 2022.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Chances are that the driver does not know that they hit this.
And if they do know, they don't give a darn.

Look for a user of the alley, with a black truck, with a scrape down the side, there will be my suspect for this damage.


It is a shame that there are careless people that do not care what they destroy.

That is a tale in itself, and I will cease now.

ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If that was mine I'd just push the block back where it goes, whip up a bucket of mortar, patch it up and be done with it.
Ok, so if one was going to pursue this route...even if just for the several-months-long wait for a proper demolish/rebuild:

-How the heck would you go about doing this?
Building Plant Door Road surface Tree

It seems to me like the section of ball from block 4 up through block 11 need to be brought back over to the right. Blocks 3B, 2B, and 1B also appeared to have moved with that section of wall.

I don't see how you could really exert the kind of somewhat-uniform force you'd need to bring that entire section over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The other somewhat obvious issue is related to the insurance-claim side of things. I definitely need to have the adjuster come out and look at it before I go attempting any kind of repair. I've never filed a homeowners claim before so I don't really know how that process will go. I'm hoping:

1.) I call the insurance company out and they say, "yep, thats damaged and we'll cover $20k to repair/rebuild". The $20k might be enough to build a "like-for-like" replacement (but I'd obviously want something bigger/nicer--fully insulated, upgraded electrical, perhaps even a bathroom)
2.) While I wait for a builder/build-able-time, I do my best to push that section of wall back into place (or at a bare minimum, fill the holes).
3.) the insurance cuts me a check for $20k
3.) I find a builder to build a proper garage, probably costing more like $40k, and I make up the difference.

I dunno. A reality check may be in order.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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In the 7th photo inspect the wall, around the midpoint, or further and you will find some hidden damage, where the entire wall has moved a bit.

All that is needing to move back to the originating point.

Not a chore for a beginner.

Get a mason repair person to advise you before you have a catastrophe of falling wall onto yourself.

All this " oh just push here, or there", is inviting disaster that is deadly.

ED
 

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Generally you are allowed to repair a bldg that wouldn't be permitted today. Tear it down and I'd about guarantee it can't be rebuilt in it's current location but normally structures like that are grandfathered in and can legally be repaired. I'd repair it unless I was wanting to [and could afford] to build one in a different location.
 

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in re: rebuild.

Ok, so if one was going to pursue this route...even if just for the several-months-long wait for a proper demolish/rebuild:
in re: rebuild.
Possible.. The Zoning may allow -0- lot line clearance; if not, it probably did at one time.
A possible way to replace it is with a Remodel Permit.
Verify this locally.
With a remod .. you must leave standing a percentage, usually measured in lineal wall footage, of the original structure; then add your expansion.

In your situation it should be worth investigation of this possibility.
 
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