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I recently had my covered patio closed in. The individual we hired to do it did it in this order: he first framed the wall, then placed the windows, then hung the cement siding, finally put in insulation and plywood on the inside. Should plywood have been installed between the frame and the concrete siding? What about flashing around the windows and house wrap installed? We are worried about moisture, mold, and proper insulation.
 

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I recently had my covered patio closed in. The individual we hired to do it did it in this order: he first framed the wall, then placed the windows, then hung the cement siding, finally put in insulation and plywood on the inside. Should plywood have been installed between the frame and the concrete siding? What about flashing around the windows and house wrap installed? We are worried about moisture, mold, and proper insulation.
What about the building permit and the inspections that would insure the job was built to Code.
Did you get an updated C of O(Certificate of Occupancy) for the new work?
 

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Your contractor is obligated to follow the plans. If you had no plans, they will typically follow your instructions. Of course, if they pulled a permit, they are obligated to follow code. In the event that no permit was required, they may still be obligated to follow code, that is a legal issue beyond my knowledge.

As to flashing, of course windows should be flashed, however if it is not on your plans or in your contract, the contractor may not be obligated to flash. Building wrap? That is generally required by code, but again, if they pulled no permit, and building wrap is not on the plans, they may not be obligated to provide wrap. As for plywood between the frame and the siding, that would depend on the type of siding, and manufacturers recommendations, but again, if you have no plans and no written instructions, it is hard to know what the contractor is obligated to do.
 

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What about the foundation for the wall and windows/door? Did you extend/thicken it as per minimum safety Code? No secondary water barrier...... perhaps you live where it doesn't rain...... Corner shear plywood is usually installed if in the U.S. Will your Homeowners Insurance even cover this conversion without a permit or paperwork in case of a claim? When you go to sell, will the County/city require removal of the structure? Falling down or rotting/molding-away is one thing, at least get an Electrical permit for any modifications, so it doesn't burn down.

Don't shoot the messenger...

Gary
 

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There's a few things wrong here and if you have any recourse on the guy, you really need to consider it. The foundation is most likely flatwork. It is not a load bearing foundation and most likely has no beamage in the slab to carry the weight of the extra materials and any furnishings you'll add. It's going to move and not with the house depending on the Plasticity Index of your soil.
You said he put the cement siding on the studs- WRONG! Any cement siding is only a cosmetic, NOT a weather proof finish. It MUST have a drain plane installed under it like plywood, T-Ply, felt, any water resistant membrane. Otherwise, when it rains, it's going to go thru and around the siding and you're going to have a mess on your hands. I'd suggest going to any of the makers of the cement sidings like Hardi and look at the installation specifications. It sounds like it's not even close to being installed correctly. Here's the specs for James Hardi siding:
http://www.jameshardie.com/builder/products_siding_hardieplankLapSiding.py?openTab=jsnavLink4

There are several methods to flash a window and some do not require a metal flashing. It is an accepted practice to use an asphalt based tape around the windows after the windows have been set in silicone caulk. I'm not a fan of the tape as I've seen it fall on a hot day. We required our installers to staple the tape at the out side edge to eliminate the issue.
House wrap is not generally a requirement, at least in Texas it's not a requirement. But I'd also be concerned about the slab being too low versus requirements. You should have 8" of slab between grade (the outside dirt) and the floor of the structure. Failure to follow this will cause rain to splash up and get under the plates, running into the house. Did he seal the plates as he put them down? Probably not as it sounds like this guy didn't have a clue what he was doing.
 
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