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Discussion Starter #21
Splice is within the wall cavity - Typical 100 year old knob and tube installation - Not inside a junction box. I didn't think wire nuts were acceptable in this type of application. A friend sent me the info below.

ARTICLE 394 of the 2002 NEC​
Commentary from the NFPA Handbook
ARTICLE 394 Concealed Knob-and-Tube Wiring

394.56 Splices and Taps.
Splices shall be soldered unless approved splicing devices are used. In-line or strain splices shall not be used.​
Wire nuts are not allowed to be used outside of boxes; neither would butt-splices or WAGO connector type
connections. Split-bolt connections are allowed, but not practical, and subject to failure over time. Also none
of those connectors could be concealed. This only leaves a “Mechanical” splicing method, such as a “Pig-tail”,
“Knotted Tap” or “Western-Union”. (Modified or Traditional) These splicing methods will be covered later in
this document. According to 110.14(B), all splices need to be mechanically and electrically secure, and not
dependant on solder for continuity, it also requires that the splice be insulated with rubber, and friction tape, or
thermoplastic tape greater than the thickness of the insulation of the conductor.​
110.14(B) Splices. Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use or by brazing, welding,
or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy. Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and
electrically secure without solder and then be soldered. All splices and joints and the free ends of conductors shall be​
covered with an insulation equivalent to that of the conductors or with an insulating device identified for the purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
It should also be noted that when I say I "crimped" the wires they were already pigtailed together and I was just using the pliers to insure good contact before soldering.
 

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elect, contractor
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perhaps its time to consider rewiring that circuit up to date and code, as naustalgic as having old knob and tube in good working condition may be nothing lasts forever and you will find it to become more problematic over time, plus if you do not gfi protect that circuit it does contain the potential to some day through an electrical fault (due to the lack of a ground) to electricute someone.

besides insurance companies hate it and sometimes demand it to be removed or will refuse to insure or renew insurance.

for resale it is a hinderence as it gets a big X on a home inspectors list
 
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