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Discussion Starter #1
S there way to check if I have too much load on my panel. I would think if breakers don't trip there no problem. I've added a few circuits but they've caused no problems. My wife think I have too many loads on the panel. Thanks
 

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You can do a demand load calculation to see what size your service should be.

Unless you added large loads I doubt you have issues.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Jim Port said:
You can do a demand load calculation to see what size your service should be. Unless you added large loads I doubt you have issues.
Thanks. How can I go about that?
 

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Is your wife a electrician?

In addition to above, a CAT III clamp meter will detect the amt of amperage being drawn thru a conductor without disturbing the connection. Of course the circuit would need to under a load in order to detect it.
 

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If your not tripping breakers ?
Then your probably ok
You do not just add up all
your breakers ratings.
Cause not all circuits run at
full capacity all the time.
and at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks a lot.....the lights in the kitchen dim slightly when we turn the microwave on if that's any indication.
 

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S there way to check if I have too much load on my panel. I would think if breakers don't trip there no problem. I've added a few circuits but they've caused no problems. My wife think I have too many loads on the panel. Thanks
And do you always listen to your wife?
 
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Thanks a lot.....the lights in the kitchen dim slightly when we turn the microwave on if that's any indication.
Most likely more load on that leg in the panel. Or just a loose Neutral. Just need to call an electrician to use a Clamp-on Amp meter to check the load after they go through and tighten up all of the wires.

If they see more load on one leg and less on the other, they can also move circuits around in the panel to help balance it out.

Depending on how old the house is and who did the wiring last. You never know what you may find. It is like opening a present from your Grandmother. You know that you will not like it and just nod your head and smile.
 

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Attempting to balance the loads in a residential panel is an exercise in futility. The loads are too transient.
 
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My first guess would be the micro and lights are on the same circuit, and he doesn't have a panel loading issue but a branch loading issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
gregzoll said:
Most likely more load on that leg in the panel. Or just a loose Neutral. Just need to call an electrician to use a Clamp-on Amp meter to check the load after they go through and tighten up all of the wires. If they see more load on one leg and less on the other, they can also move circuits around in the panel to help balance it out. Depending on how old the house is and who did the wiring last. You never know what you may find. It is like opening a present from your Grandmother. You know that you will not like it and just nod your head and smile.
Lmao...thx
 

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bingo - the mico should be on a dedicated circuit or one of the 20 amp kitchen outlet circuits

most micros are 1000 to 1500 watts, equivelant to turning on 10 to 15 (100 watt) light bulbs at once
 

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You can do a demand load calculation to see what size your service should be.

Unless you added large loads I doubt you have issues.
This is good, but better is just crank everything up in house on a worst case scenario and put on a clamp meter and measure both phases
 

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This is good, but better is just crank everything up in house on a worst case scenario and put on a clamp meter and measure both phases
That is not acceptable per NEC.You may do an article 220 standard or optional load calculation the normal way or

220.87 Determining Existing Loads. The calculation of a
feeder or service load for existing installations shall be
permitted to use actual maximum demand to determine the
existing load under all of the following conditions:

(1) The maximum demand data is available for a 1-year
period.
Exception: If the maximum demand data for a 1-year period
is not available, the calculated load shall be permitted
to be based on the maximum demand (measure of average
power demand over a 15-minute period) continuously recorded
over a minimum 30-day period using a recording
ammeter or power meter connected to the highest loaded
phase of the feeder or service, based on the initial loading
at the start of the recording. The recording shall reflect the
maximum demand of the feeder or service by being taken
when the building or space is occupied and shall include by
measurement or calculation the larger of the heating or
cooling equipment load, and other loads that may be periodic
in nature due to seasonal or similar conditions.

(2) The maximum demand at 125 percent plus the new
load does not exceed the ampacity of the feeder or
rating of the service.

(3) The feeder has overcurrent protection in accordance
with 240.4, and the service has overload protection in
accordance with 230.90.
 
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