DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Kitchen renovation project: I finally have the receptacle wiring run to almost all the boxes. Should finish today. Right now, I just have about 12" of the sheathed cable sticking out of the boxes. What do I need to do in order to call in the inspector for rough wiring inspection? Do I need to cut the sheath and expose the wires? I know I don't need the final devices present. Basically, what will the inspector be looking for? Will he trace every circuit and "approve" wiring for each, or is this first inspection for "technique", to approve general wiring appearance and pathway? Thanks in advance for all replies.
 

·
A "Handy Husband"
Joined
·
11,844 Posts
Cut the sheath back to leave 1/4 to 1/2 " in the box, make up the grounds, leave about 6 - 8 " of wire coiled up in the box.

Make sure box is grounded (if metal box), any internal clamps are secured. He will be looking at the way the cables are routed and secured.

Since this is a kitchen he will be looking for 2 20 amp (#12 wire) circuits for the counter tops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Right now I have all the functions of the wiring written in marker on all the sheaths. I suppose to keep everything straight, I need to label all the wires individually. The inspector doesn't require that though, right?
 

·
Master Electrician
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
Typically the sheathing is removed, joints made up as needed, especially the grounds, jumpers for feeds to switches, etc. Our inspectors want to see the grounds made up and necessary metal bonded. Basically, have it set to the point that you could install the final devices now if you wanted too.

If your wiring is installed where it looks nice and clean…properly supported and stapled, etc., most of the time an inspector isn’t going to ‘trace’ the wiring runs. He might ask you a few questions about it, but if it looks pretty, you’ve done one of the most important task…made a good first impression.

FWIW…everybody does it different, but what I do for the 2 GFI receptacle circuits is 1) write ‘GFI 1’ or ‘GFI 2’ inside the box they’re going in & 2) strip the black and white of the line side that’s going to hook to the GFI’s (as if I was going to actually hook it up). Later when you go to actually install the recepts you’ll know line from load. You can label the wires if you want to, but it’s not required too.
 

·
A "Handy Husband"
Joined
·
11,844 Posts
Right now I have all the functions of the wiring written in marker on all the sheaths. I suppose to keep everything straight, I need to label all the wires individually. The inspector doesn't require that though, right?
Make up all the connections so that the only wire ends are those that will connect to a device. At a receptacle location, I like to pig tail the in/out wires so that all I have the connection to the device to deal with. As SD515 mentioned, you do need to mark the line side connections for a GFCI receptacle, a dab with a magic marker will do it.
 

·
Lic Electrical Inspector
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
I require all splices be made up. No devices.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top