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Discussion Starter #1
We are making some electrical changes to our home, we will have it inspected before drywall goes up but i wanted to run it past some experts before we go to the trouble of doing it...
2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1 living room, 1 kitchen -

All receptacles on 12-2 copper nm sheathed romex
All light switches and fixtures on 14-2 copper nm sheathed romex
Kitchen receptacles on 20-amp breakers, 2 circuits for normal appliances
Stove on dedicated circuit and 240 wire, 50amp breaker
Refrigerator on dedicated circuit
Bathroom on dedicated circuits, one receptacle GFCI protected
Bedrooms on shared circuit, one circuit 14-2 for lights, one circuit 12-2 for all receptacles inside bedrooms. Total of 9 receptacles on this circuit.
Hot water heater on dedicated 10-2 circuit
Dryer on dedicated circuit with 240 wire, 30amp breaker
Washer on 12-2 wire with 20amp breaker, dedicated circuit.

Does this sound okay? If any of it is wrong let me know. We would like to stick close to code since it will be inspected
 

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We are making some electrical changes to our home, we will have it inspected before drywall goes up but i wanted to run it past some experts before we go to the trouble of doing it...
2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1 living room, 1 kitchen -

All receptacles on 12-2 copper nm sheathed romex
All light switches and fixtures on 14-2 copper nm sheathed romex
Kitchen GFCI receptacles on 20-amp breakers, 2 circuits for normal appliances
Stove on dedicated circuit and 240 wire, 50amp breaker
Refrigerator on dedicated circuit
Bathroom on dedicated circuits, one receptacle GFCI protected (other bathroom receps downstream from the GFCI)
Bedrooms on shared circuit, one circuit 14-2 for lights, one circuit 12-2 for all (AFCI?) receptacles inside bedrooms. Total of 9 receptacles on this circuit.
Hot water heater on dedicated 10-2 circuit
Dryer on dedicated circuit with 240 wire, 30amp breaker
Washer on 12-2 wire with 20amp breaker, dedicated circuit.

Does this sound okay? If any of it is wrong let me know. We would like to stick close to code since it will be inspected
Comments in red above.
 

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Sounds good.
Remember that AFCI breakers are required for the bedrooms, and the bath and kitchen receptales need to be gfci protected.
 

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Are the lights going to be on separate circuits from the receptacles? You can't have 14/2 on 20 amp circuits. Don't forget about smoke detectors and AFCI circuit breakers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Dave. There is only one receptacle in the bathroom, which i plan to make a GFCI receptacle. What is a AFCI receptacle? Never heard of it.
Also, the bedroom light switches will be dimmer switches.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Joed: Receptacles are on their own circuit, with 15amp breakers for everything except the kitchen, dryer and hot water heater. Lights are on their own circuit as well with 15amp breakers. My husband will not allow a hardwired fire alarm so we use the battery-operated ones.

jbfan: thanks, i know about the GFCI but not the AFCI. What is that?
 

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Don't sell yourself short.
If you are using #12 for the receptacles, put them on a 20 amp breaker.
AFGI breakers are required pretty much anyplace the dosen't require gfci.
AFCI's do not yet come as a receptacle, but breakers only.
Do a serach for afci.

Code may require a hardwired, interconnected smoke detectors
 

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Depending on the version of the NEC code your municipality has adopted, you may need AFCI for all outlets, not just the bedrooms. The kitchen and bathroom still stay as GFCI's.

I believe a GFCI is required for laundry circuits, but since you have an electric dryer, at least the washer will need one.

Also, you should check your local code on how many outlets you can have in one circuit. I know the NEC code doesn't put a limit, but local code may.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There is no local code, my area is pretty much unimproved and low populated so there isnt a code yet. We are trying to stick to NEC code only. We were told we could put up to 17 outlets on one circuit, but im not going anywhere near that limit. We were also told by the electrician at lowes that a laundry room receptacle was not required to be a GFCI, just the bathroom and kitchen.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
jbfan: This way it will throw the breaker before the wire would get hot. The wire can take 20amps, but the breaker will only allow 15 before tripping, right?
 

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The laundry room circuit will need to be gfci protected if it is within 6 feet of a laundry sink, otherwise no gfci required.
 

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jbfan: This way it will throw the breaker before the wire would get hot. The wire can take 20amps, but the breaker will only allow 15 before tripping, right?
You ar wasting money if you run #12 and only use a 15 amp breaker.
You can run #14 and use a 15 amp breaker and save money.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
not worried about money, we are near retirement and have plenty of cash. we are worried about safety, since this is an old mobile home and if a fire were to start, we could not easily jump out of a window, we would most likely burn up. Trying to do this the safest way, regardless of cost.
 

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If it is installed correctly, why should you worry about a fire?

Just a waste of time, effort and money to put a #12 on a 15 amp breaker.
 

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A couple of items you may already be aware of:

Dryer circuit requires 10/3 cable (+ ground) (30 amp) and a 4 wire receptacle.

Since this is a mobile home the panel in your home is a sub panel. All grounds and neutrals must be kept separate.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
yes i am aware of that, thank you for telling me. We have done a lot of research on how to hook everything into the panel box, so we know where all of the wire goes, its just the matter of actually doing it now. I went last night and bought a 250' roll of 12-2 wire and 100' of 14-2, and some 10-2 so we can go ahead and finish all of the wiring except the dryer, which isnt hard since it is like four feet from the power box and that particular wire will run under the trailer in a conduit, which is how the wire was to begin with, and also how the stove wire was to begin with
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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yes i am aware of that, thank you for telling me. We have done a lot of research on how to hook everything into the panel box, so we know where all of the wire goes, its just the matter of actually doing it now. I went last night and bought a 250' roll of 12-2 wire and 100' of 14-2, and some 10-2 so we can go ahead and finish all of the wiring except the dryer, which isnt hard since it is like four feet from the power box and that particular wire will run under the trailer in a conduit, which is how the wire was to begin with, and also how the stove wire was to begin with
If you have contiguous conduit from the panel to the box behind the dryer, run THHN/THWN #10 wire. 4 runs -2 black, 1 white, 1 green. Any electrical supply or big box will cut the lengths you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah the conduit is attached to the trailer under the power box and runs under the floor joists to directly under the dryer plug, where it elbows up into the trailer floor and then the wire is free to run up the wall into the workbox. The stove wire is the same way, since it runs about thirty feet, there is a 1/2" conduit coming out of the trailer under the plug and it runs below the floor joists, all the way down the trailer and then elbows up into the power box, so there are actually three conduits extending into the power box, one for the stove, one for the dryer, and one from the power pole. Its always been that way and im thankful because nothing can disturb those power lines. especially that expensive thirty-foot 240 wire
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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You cannot use my previous suggestion of THHN wire since you do not have conduit the full run. You need to complete the conduit the whole way or use cable.
 
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