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Discussion Starter #1
When you have two breakers joined together and each of the two joined breakers is individually labeled as 30 or 50 or.. (see the attached), that means that the circuit is 30 or 50 amps and not the sum of the two?


Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you don't mind I'd like to take this a bit further so I'm not a complete dunce when we finally arrange for an electrician to figure out where to get the necessary power. Just say stop if we get to a point that requires pulling off the panel face..


The panel in question is one of two. It's the original panel for the original house. We have a new panel at the opposite end of the house feeding the large addition 1999 and service increase.


The Thermador electric cooktop that is dying is directly upstairs from panel 1 and currently has a 30 amp breaker. I'm told by Thermador that their most basic cooktop now requires 40 amps, that the better electric tops take 50 amps.


So if our panel 1 has no vacancies, how does an electrician go about 'stealing' power from other slots that are in use, if that's even an option? Btw, getting power from panel 2 is out of the question given the distance and lack of point to point access.



Mark
 

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The electrician would just run new cable (wire) from the panel to the new cooktop.

The new cable would need to be of the proper gauge for the load, and the breaker would need to be upgraded.

For 40 amp, the gauge would be #8 and for 50 amp it would be #6.

The old cable would be removed, if possible, allowing the the new cable to be run in it's place, if possible. If the existing cable is run in conduit, there are some restrictions as to whether or not the size of the cable allowed in conduit. But, your electrician will know all that.
 

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flipping slumlord
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The Thermador electric cooktop that is dying is directly upstairs
from panel 1 and currently has a 30 amp breaker.
Job #1) someone competent needs to go through these panels
to identify exactly what EVERY breaker is doing. Take careful notes.

I'm told by Thermador that their most basic cooktop now requires 40 amps, that the better electric tops take 50 amps.

So if our panel 1 has no vacancies, how does...
This will require installing new (40A rated) wire between and a new 40A 2pole breaker.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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Mark....There are options to free-up buss space in a panel....or install a new subpanel....etc

BUT is not your real issue , if I have not misunderstood you, that you want to replace your present 30A cooktop circuit with a 40 (or 50) A circuit.?????

Changing the breakers is not an issue, changing your circuit wiring likely is your material prohlem. Your circuit is likely #10 guage wire, and your new cooktop will require #8.

It is possible that perhaps you have #8 allready, but that will require you to take off your dead front of the panel to check...... and you said to stop you at this point.

Your electrician will be able to diagnose that in two minutes (30 seconds per screw.)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys, I've now got a good handle on what to expect. I'll get a hold of our electrician once the dust settles from the other brush fires I'm putting out ;-)!


Mark
 

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Since you already have a cooktop on a double 30 amp breaker that is being replaced, you have the space. The double 30 currently in use will no longer be needed and can be removed and replaced by whatever the new cooktop requires.
 
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