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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've just completed a New Build house. The RCD kept tripping out and the electrician finally pinned it down to a circuit in the attic bedroom. He has moved this circuit to a "less protected fuse" and the tripping has stopped. He believes that a nail / screw from wall or ceiling boards put in place after the wiring was laid, has pierced the wire somewhere and is causing a short between the neutral and earth wires. Locating it he says could mean reopening walls / ceilings that have been completed and decorated, causing additional cost and disruption. He is prepared to issue his certificate for the whole wiring system and separately has written me a letter confirming whilst "not ideal, it is not dangerous" and there is no risk of it becoming worse. I am not an electrician, but personally I am concerned that any shorting of the wiring system could become a serious issue, possibly a fire hazard and whilst I have a high regard for our electrician who has always maintained high standards to date, I'd be grateful for the views of any professional electricians. Thanks
 

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If it is in fact a pierced cable ?
Then it needs to be found and fixed !
Get another electrician with a better attitude
and get the problem fixed.

Or you could be held legally liable
if someone gets hurt.

:whistling2:

once you know for sure what the problem is
then you can decide on who to chase up for
the bill to repair.

At this moment you dont know for sure.
But the first point of call should be the electrician
who wired the house, I imagine it is his responsibilitry
to sort it out.
 

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That is extremely dangerous, along with a code violation. He is not a real electrician, get someone else. RCDs in IEC countries do pretty much do what AFCIs do here. If a cable is pierced via nail or staple current going to the PE (ground wire) will cause an imbalance and trip the RCD. Without an RCD that current will continue creating dangerous arcing which can start a fire. Keep in mind this is 230 volts to ground rather than 120, so the danger from an arc is much greater.

If the neutral is faulting to ground from a damaged cable there is a good chance the insulation on the hot is also damaged so the above scenario is real.

The fault needs to be corrected and the circuit needs to back onto an RCD.
 

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New build house this is FIXED before I make final payment! if this clown had done things correctly there would have been a metal shield over anlace where a nail or screw could have penetrated the wire...unless you all were hanging wallboard with sixteen penny nails.

Do NOT accept this job. Ron
 

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The fact that there is a neutral-ground fault is not really dangerous by itself. However, the possibility of a damaged cable certainly is. A pierced cable may be right on the verge of a short circuit, or a high-resistance fault (which is much more dangerous and may cause a fire without tripping a circuit breaker), and certainly can get worse eventually, perhaps years in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Earth Neutral short - dangerous?

Many thanks to all who have taken the time to reply to my query - all of whom have confirmed my gut feel of concern!

To answer OSO954's query - its a UK based project.

All the best
 
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