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I have a Ford F800 with a diesel engine that has two 12 volt batteries. The engine turns over very slowly and only a couple revolutions before it stops when I turn the ignition key to start it. I checked the voltage on the batteries and each reads 12+ volts. After a couple of attempts to start the truck and it not turning over fast enough to start the engine I took the batteries off and brought them to my barn where I put them on a charger overnight. The charger indicated that they were both fully charged the next morning and they read 13+ volts with my multimeter so that evening after work I re-installed them in the truck and tried it again and got the same results. I believe the batteries are remanufactured batteries but they've always started the truck easily until I let it sit for a few weeks a month or so ago. My question is this, is there a chance the batteries have the voltage but not the amperage required to start the truck engine? Is there any other potential problem that could be causing the engine to turn over so slowly such as a defective starter (I noticed the conductors connecting the two batteries and then going to the starter were hot to the touch (like almost melt the insulation hot, and these are heavy cables)? If you got this far thanks for reading; any suggestions or advice is greatly appreciated. Happy Thanksgiving to all!
 

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Heat is resistance, usually from corrosion. Check the ground cables. From the batteries and from the engine block to the frame.

If the any of the battery cables have internal corrosion, they'll have to be replaced. This is usually the case if you can see corrosion at at either end of the cables under the insulation.

Good luck.

Have a good day.
 

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Take those batteries in to a place that will load test them. Or, if they are not maintenance free batteries, a battery hygrometer can give specific gravity readings on every cell. Either test should show if there is a bad cell.

As mentioned above clean the posts and cable ends before reconnecting. While the batteries are disconnected, I’d be check the connections at the starter and starter relay. Any doubt about cleanliness, I’d disconnect, clean and reconnect those as well.
 

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My question is this, is there a chance the batteries have the voltage but not the amperage required to start the truck engine?
Yes, that is the death rattle of an geriatric lead-acid battery that is at 4-6 years of age and dying. This is the nature of lead-acid batteries. Upside: they're ridiculously dirt cheap, and good at surge currents e.g. to start engines.

Other than that, they are garbage as batteries go. Any other kind is superior. Edison competed with nickel-iron for electric vehicles in the 1890s... and those last 40 years. I have several sets of NiCd in historic vehicles that were new to the vehicle. Lithium, the jury's still out on those, but it ain't looking bad.

However, cheap lead acid batteries have misprogrammed the values expectations of many people, to the point where they expect quality batteries at new lead-acid price points (10 cents a paper watt-hour or 15 cents a CCA). That really is too bad, because that price point isn't ever gonna happen.

Quality battery prices are in free-fall due to upscaling of EVs and battery storage, but yeah, they'll never hit the price point of lead-acid. People buy them because they are better. Seriously, people who try to use lead-acid for EV or home power applications just end up failing miserably and having to do multiple pack replacements. They don't save a penny.

For cars I just hit CostCo and pay $130 ish for another lead-acid I might get 5 years out of, because getting an $800 real battery for that job makes no sense, it would outlast the car lol.
 

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A few years ago a good car battery was $30, now they are routinely way over $100. Remanufactured batteries? Isn’t that like remanufactured toilet paper? As said, check cables and connections. Barring that I bet on bad batteries. My son has an old Topkick truck. Over the years we found that we can charge the batteries, jump start it, use jumper packs and everything we can think of to get it going. Until we buy new batteries it is futile. New batteries and it starts reliably even in cold weather for a few years, then it is time for new batteries again.
 

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I would never use a re manufactured battery in my vehicle. I head to Costco and for around 100 dollars I get a battery that will last to the end of the warranty. If it fails Costco gives me a new battery.

I worked at a place where we had all sorts of battery equipment. 3-4 different chargers, and all of the raw materials. I drained a 12 volt deep cell. Put new fluid in and then charged it for 24 hours fairly slowly. Read fine the first day. When the 3 day rolled around the voltage was falling.
No problem it was because it was not getting a charge. Installed it in a piece of equipment which sat over the weekend (off) and it failed on Monday morning. It was a nice experement. I learn that all of the hype and fluff does not recondition a battery. Unless you can work on the cell itself.

Hint buy new batteries with a 3 year warranty
 

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I'd get a boost from someone, or a battery pack first.
Because you mentioned wires getting hot, if you go with the jump start from someone, they should have their engine off (it could blow their alternator if it's on).

If that starts the truck easily, then measure to make sure your alternator is charging.
Then I would check the batteries (load test)

If the boost doesn't work, ie it's not turning over fast, chances are the starter is just about fried.
 
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