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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, as I understand it, you put mud on the seam, then you apply the tape and embed it wiping off the excess. then what? do you have to wait till it dries to apply a layer of mud over the tape or do you apply a thin layer over it on the first go? (right after embedding it)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
^^ neither of those say


STEP 2: Spread mud, apply tape, wipe tight

(...)

STEP 3: Tape The Angles
So that guy doesn't apply a coat over the tape immediately after he embeds the tape. I guess he puts the coat over after it dries.
 

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Wait until the tape is dry before re-coating....
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Bjbatlanta , I see you are a drywall contractor so can I pick your brain - can I ask why? will there be problems?
I'm just wondering why things are done in such a way so my unknowledgable self can understand a little bit better.

I appreciate the help.
 

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Most pros throw a little mud on afterward. But you should not. The main reason for a beginner to follow the steps, and only work in the prescribed progressive steps while taping is that it is far easier to disturb the bedding process (move the tape a little) than you might think.

This will invariably cause air pockets, and give you more work to repair. Just don't do it. :mad: :)

I have a feeling that you are going to learn that patience (or lack thereof) may well be a downfall in your drywall work. Don't plan on finishing a room in a weekend if you are just beginning to learn. You don't have to. There's no rush. Go slowly, and follow the suggestions................ DESPITE what some guy you run across somewhere will tell you about how fast he can knock out a whole house with twenty minute mud.
 

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BTW. Has anyone yet told you to look at your tape and see if it has a pronounced center bead or ridge? That side goes against the wall... always. You do not want that raised center of the tape sticking out into the room. And sometimes, as it dries, it will spring outward, and do just that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
BTW. Has anyone yet told you to look at your tape and see if it has a pronounced center bead or ridge? That side goes against the wall... always. You do not want that raised center of the tape sticking out into the room. And sometimes, as it dries, it will spring outward, and do just that.
Nope. I never would have even thought about that for butt joints and such.( but i knew for corners) I appreciate the help. You probably saved me a bit of frustration.

I'll follow your advice a take it step by step.

I plan on using a 90 min hot mud to embed the paper. Then after it dries use an all-purpose for the following coats. Is this ok? or do you think I should get some light compound?
 

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I have to disagree with one of Willie's statements. None of the pros I know apply mud over wet tape. Main reason is it affects the drying process. Ready mix compound dries from the outside. If you apply mud over wet tape, especially in a damp or humid situation, the next day the mud appears to be dry (and is on top). You apply more mud (bed coat). Following day you skim coat. The mud under the actual tape may not be completely dry even yet. You sand and paint and days later you start to see the joints. It's called "delayed shrinkage". The mud shrinks as it dries and it can take days to thoroughly dry under certain circumstances. More likely in new houses where the drywall is finished in rainy/cold weather (or a basement where the HVAC is not yet operating). And contrary to popular belief, using the "torpedo" heaters doesn't help that much with drying mud as they actually produce a lot of water vapor when running. The rest of Willie's advice is correct (and good point about the tape crease). Using the 90 for taping is fine. I would stay away from using any lightweight compounds......
 

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Pros use a banjo or other automatic tape applicators. these embed the tape on both sides with compound. Why do you not see this as the same as a very thin top coat? I use 5' diameter fans to dry the compound. This air flow allows be to do a basement in two days. For smaller jobs like a bath I can do all three coats the same day and never had any problems.
 

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Pros use a banjo or other automatic tape applicators. these embed the tape on both sides with compound. Why do you not see this as the same as a very thin top coat? I use 5' diameter fans to dry the compound. This air flow allows be to do a basement in two days. For smaller jobs like a bath I can do all three coats the same day and never had any problems.
Three coats of drying compound in one day? Or, are you using setting compound for the first coat?
 

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Even using a banjo or bazooka, you have to wipe the tape down after applying it to the wall if you're doing the work properly. That essentially removes the mud from the top of the tape. Granted there may be a bit of residual mud left, but it's not like wiping the tape down to adhere it to the surface and then coming back and putting a layer of mud right back on top of it (as I BELIEVE the OP was talking about). I guess that's a matter of interpretation. And I too use fans, electric heat, heat gun, etc. to expedite drying on small jobs. I wouldn't think it advisable for a DIY'er to cut any corners. Hope that clarifies my point. Not saying my way is the only correct way either, just best in my opinion....
Oh, and definitely using setting compound for all but the final coat for one day process. It sets by chemical reaction, not air drying and does not shrink nearly as much as ready mix.
 

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Granted there may be a bit of residual mud left,
this is the very thin coat that WillieT and I are talking about. Not to go back and add a second coat until the first is dry.

I use hot mud on first and second coats. Lightweight for third and touch-ups after priming. My point with the fans is that air movement is far better then heat. Most all heaters will add too much moisture to the air. But the fans I use are like wind tunnels.
 

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Understood. I think the OP is talking about hand taping and a light coat right away. And I agree that fans are the only way to properly attempt to "force dry" mud. Throw in an electric space heater or two if there's a bit of a chill. I know a lot of people like lightweight, but it sure scratches and dings a lot easier than regular ready mix. Haven't even tried it in years, but it used to seem awfully hard to pull too. Maybe it's better these days (and maybe brands differ too).
 

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if you are using paper tape on any bevel joints or drywall sheets that butt up (side to side)never double up(2 coat same day..seems to have a bubble effect...expanding joints past the level they should be filled (there isnt much on bevel joints,butt joints unless perfectly framed beneath drywall,always are humped,requiring at leasta 12 inch coat of mud on each side of the butt joint tape (its the highest side & your trying to blend it with existing wall..leave more mud to the outsides.of that tape..but make sure your tape is covered with 2 nd coat &skim coat:no:
 

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I see your point bjbatlanta..many times we have experimented ..half a bucket of box mud into a slury(pump mud)then add sheetrock 45 or 90 sowe have time to work with it and also guarantees drying where we have not applicable heating guarunteed in custom homes,or commercial jobs...:no:
 

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if you were using fiba tape ..yes add 1 st coat of mud...if your joints are paper taped let them dry...your boxmud that you mixed with water to apply to those joints will or should shrink or tighten..nothing but probs if you cut this corner....:no:
 
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