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Discussion Starter #1
I'm hoping a pro-drywaller or skilled DIYer can give me a little direction.

I have a four foot wide floor to ceiling interior wall that needs a very large patch. The hole is about two feet wide and from the floor to less than six inches below the drywall seam.

To the left of the hole is an inside corner, to the right an outside corner.

I'm not sure which is the easier and cleaner course of action, keeping in mind that I am not very skilled with drywall -

1. Patch it as is, and deal with the resulting butt joints.

2. Pull the entire 4x4 lower sheet of drywall out, leaving me finishing half an inside corner, half an outside corner, and retaping the taper joint.

3. Pull out the lower and upper drywall sheets and start from scratch on that wall.

Thoughts?
 

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Hi Dug and welcome to the forum.

The answer somewhat depends upon how visible the area will be. In some places anything less than perfect sticks out like the old sore thumb. but in other places no one cares.

However, I'm in favor of a good patch and if you get it started right and work it slowly (with our help) it will come out fine.

If you could post a picture of the area it would help us see what is best.

Bud
 
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The problem you will run it most likely will be a corner bead on the outside corner.I would replace the 4 x 4 sheet .You can probably scrape the existing mud from the existing outside corner,remove the screws or nails and slide the new drywall behind it if your careful. Make sure to retape the inside corner before mudding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both. It's in a very visible area - it's the first thing you see as you enter the bathroom. I'll upload some photos later.

I'm remodeling the bathroom at the moment. There was previously a badly installed plumbing access panel there, with drywall damage visible beyond the panel. When I removed the drywall on the other side of the wall (on the tub side), I found that there was a bad patch below the panel as well, which started failing due to movement. While squaring out the hole for the panel, I figured I may as well pull the whole lot out rather than have two patches butting up against each other.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Here's the hole -




And from the back -



And a little detail of the bottom of the corner. The metal corner bead is rusting a little. The bead on the other side was completely rusted about 6" up.



The floor is being replaced, by the way. If that makes any difference.
 

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I think it can be patched although you will likely have MORE work in patching it than replacing that sheet. Nice thing is, it's a small area and it goes to an inside corner which at least makes it easier to hide any imperfections because it's not in the middle of a wall.

If you do a full replacement, as Mako said, you will likely have to remove the old corner bead and put in a new one. Those are always a pain to finish. It takes a lot of mud to do an outside corner.
 

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I would patch that----It can be done so no one can see the repair----

If you want to replace the entire sheet---the outside corner bead will need replacing--still not a difficult task.
 

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Everyone types faster than I do---------
 

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Well, after all that, it seems we are going to wainscot 2/3 up the wall anyway. So I guess I'll just attach the patch securely and skip all the pesky taping and mudding...
Funny how that works out.

Personally, I'd tape and run at least one coat over it before applying the wainscot. And toss on a coat of primer. Helps to slow down small critters that might want to take up residence...
 
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