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Greetings - I am a first time poster. I am trying to repair two 6" round holes in my kitchen ceiling due to recessed lighting that was moved.

I've already cut-out the two circles and installed them. They are screwed into some wood strips to hold them tight into the ceiling.

I should mention that my ceiling is a orange peel spray finish and it is a very thin coat.

How would you finish the job? I am hoping to not use tape to finish the small gap because the finish is so thin to begin with. Could I fill the gap with some type of caulk? I also don't want it just gob in compound only to have it crack later. Any tips on matching the orange peel finish?

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
 

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You said,"I don't want to........" If that mean you" won't " then there is no answer available.

To repair this correctly---Pack the cracks with Durrabond---tape the cracks with setting compound--
That's the All purpose with a green lid---then use topping compound (blue lid/light weight) usually 12 " wide or more.

---Mike---
 

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Get yourself some 20 minute Durabond and fiber tape. Tape the joint, mix the 20 minute and push into any space on the first coat. Scrape all excess from around the repair down to the tape. Take a blow dryer and heat area evenly until all areas have turned white. Lightly sand. Apply second coat using 20 minute Durabond. This time apply 6" around the repair covering the tape with a thin layer of mud. Blow dry and lightly sand again. Apply a third coat now feathering the repair 12" out. Dry and sand. It should be ready to apply your texture and paint. Using an activated compound with mesh tape will ensure a long lasting patch. The other benefit is you are done and ready to go in a few hours. Using standard compounds require you to use paper tape which are much harder to cover, requiring more compound and a wider feathering.
 

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You said,"I don't want to........" If that mean you" won't " then there is no answer available.

To repair this correctly---Pack the cracks with Durrabond---tape the cracks with setting compound--
That's the All purpose with a green lid---then use topping compound (blue lid/light weight) usually 12 " wide or more.

---Mike---

Hi Mike,

I just want to advise you that you shouldn't be referring to the types of mud by the color of the box or pail. Here in BC things are different.

Yellow = Taping (lots of glue)
Blue = All purpose
Green = Finish

Red = Specialty
Grey = Specialty
Orange = Spantex
etc.

Obviously there is a different color system in different areas with different manufacturers.

Dan
 

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Hi Mike,

I just want to advise you that you shouldn't be referring to the types of mud by the color of the box or pail. Here in BC things are different.

Yellow = Taping (lots of glue)
Blue = All purpose
Green = Finish

Red = Specialty
Grey = Specialty
Orange = Spantex
etc.

Obviously there is a different color system in different areas with different manufacturers.

Dan
Thanks for that,Sometimes I forget that this place covers the globe.

I'll try to change my descriptions---Mike----
 

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I make love to my walls
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Ever heard the expression "the blind leading the blind?" That's what I think of when I read some of the posts on here.
First of all don't use a hair dryer on any compound ever! Especially on 20 min durabond. It's a waste of time. Durabond sets up chemically so adding heat and air to it does absolutely nothing. Using it to speed up drying type compound (pre mixed) is even worse an idea. The product is made to dry on it's own. Let it! Rushing things by means of methods not intended by the manufacturer with drywall compounds or any other product out there is just plain hack and results in poor workmanship.
Secondly, any time you are faced with a drywall repair where there is a hole, crack, deep dent, face paper peel, etc YOU NEED TAPE! Do yourself a big favor and use paper tape. It doesn't matter that your texture is thinly layered. You have to build it out and feather it. If your new at taping you might have to feather it three feet wide to get it perfect. Thats just part of life. Don't listen to anyone who tells you that to cover a 6" patch you need to feather it 12"- not gonna happen it's going to have to be wider to make it look unnoticeable.
And lastly- use durabond to prefill the gaps first and that's it. Tape and finish with premix. Durabond is harder for a beginner to work with. You want it in the gaps for strength, Thats it.
Remember when you're putting on each coat to focus on building up the areas around the tape, not directly over the tape. It's easy for a beginner to still notice a visible hump after 2 coats and want to go over the middle again and again....don't. Your tape ideally shouldnt have any more than a 1/16" layer of compound over it.
You're going to notice those patches forever so take my advice and give up on trying to find a cheap "I don't want to tape it can't I just use caulk" alternative. And just do it the right way, the way that myself and many other experienced drywall contractors have done it, to tens of thousands of patches.
 

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Ever heard the expression "the blind leading the blind?" That's what I think of when I read some of the posts on here.
First of all don't use a hair dryer on any compound ever! Especially on 20 min durabond. It's a waste of time. Durabond sets up chemically so adding heat and air to it does absolutely nothing. Using it to speed up drying type compound (pre mixed) is even worse an idea. The product is made to dry on it's own. Let it! Rushing things by means of methods not intended by the manufacturer with drywall compounds or any other product out there is just plain hack and results in poor workmanship.
Secondly, any time you are faced with a drywall repair where there is a hole, crack, deep dent, face paper peel, etc YOU NEED TAPE! Do yourself a big favor and use paper tape. It doesn't matter that your texture is thinly layered. You have to build it out and feather it. If your new at taping you might have to feather it three feet wide to get it perfect. Thats just part of life. Don't listen to anyone who tells you that to cover a 6" patch you need to feather it 12"- not gonna happen it's going to have to be wider to make it look unnoticeable.
And lastly- use durabond to prefill the gaps first and that's it. Tape and finish with premix. Durabond is harder for a beginner to work with. You want it in the gaps for strength, Thats it.
Remember when you're putting on each coat to focus on building up the areas around the tape, not directly over the tape. It's easy for a beginner to still notice a visible hump after 2 coats and want to go over the middle again and again....don't. Your tape ideally shouldnt have any more than a 1/16" layer of compound over it.
You're going to notice those patches forever so take my advice and give up on trying to find a cheap "I don't want to tape it can't I just use caulk" alternative. And just do it the right way, the way that myself and many other experienced drywall contractors have done it, to tens of thousands of patches.
Actually it does work, and quite well. I have hundreds if not thousands of patches that would testify to the validity of this tip.

You can also leave the pan dirty (leaving a small amount of the set compound in your pan), and mix your new batch in this pan. This will also accelerate the process.

Mixing with cold water will slow the reaction and mixing with warm will speed it up.

There are many painters and drywall contractors who use these methods. The are sound methods and nothing to fear.

www. paintinganddecoratingconcourse. com/articles/Repairing-Torn-Drywall.html

You can also go over to ContractorTalk.com and search this topic. You will find plenty of pros using these techniques. Just don't post the question there, as it is for contractors.

BTW I am a General Contractor, not just some noob. I have been in the business for many many years. So there is no blind leading the blind.
 

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Rob1975 is right, adding heat to a chemical reaction will usually speed it up.(There are exceptions, always) There is sound science behind it, not a case of the blind leading the blind.
 

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When I move recessed downlights from one position to another I would.

Cut the new hole for the lighting, screw this newly cut disc to a piece of timber a couple of inches longer than the diameter of the old lighting hole, fix this in place with screws and fill the gap with "dot and dab" board adhesive.

When dry I would use a fine filler to fill and to achieve the orange peel effect use some old thick paint and a deep pile roller.
 
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