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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Removing all drywall from house we just bought and going to try and drywall myself with a friend. Will hire a taper/spackler. Any tips to do good job drywalling/sheetrocking? I know I did a board or two once and the screws popped out through the tape/spackle/paint. Any reason that happens? THanks.
 

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There called a finisher, not taper/spackler.
5/8" on the ceiling.
1/2" on the walls.
Rent or buy a drywall lift for the ceilings and reselling it on Craigslist if you buy one.
Screws need to set just below the surface. to much and it will pop over time.
I like to use an impact driver, but you could use a drill with special bits that are made to set the screw heads at the correct depth.
The walls should be started at the top, tight to the ceiling and ran horizontal using at least 12' foot sheets so there's less seams.
Take the time to pull a string over the studs to look for bowed studs.
You also want to take the time to shut the power off and remove all the light and outlet covers and the two screws holding them in and pull them out of the box and twist then so one tab sits inside the box and the other one sticks out, no need to disconnect any wires.
Before starting the wall take the time to measure out from each inside corner to make sure the seam falls in the middle of the stud to know which direction to start running the sheets.
Make sure there's "nailers" in the inside corners.
Never have a seam along side of a window or door at the top.
FIY, a real hanger crew can hang a while house in day.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There called a finisher, not taper/spackler.
5/8" on the ceiling.
1/2" on the walls.
Rent or buy a drywall lift for the ceilings and reselling it on Craigslist if you buy one.
Screws need to set just below the surface. to much and it will pop over time.
I like to use an impact driver, but you could use a drill with special bits that are made to set the screw heads at the correct depth.
The walls should be started at the top, tight to the ceiling and ran horizontal using at least 12' foot sheets so there's less seams.
Take the time to pull a string over the studs to look for bowed studs.
You also want to take the time to shut the power off and remove all the light and outlet covers and the two screws holding them in and pull them out of the box and twist then so one tab sits inside the box and the other one sticks out, no need to disconnect any wires.
Before starting the wall take the time to measure out from each inside corner to make sure the seam falls in the middle of the stud to know which direction to start running the sheets.
Make sure there's "nailers" in the inside corners.
Never have a seam along side of a window or door at the top.
FIY, a real hanger crew can hang a while house in day.
thanks a lot!
 

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Screws need to set just below the surface. to much and it will pop over time.

It's important that the screw head doesn't go thru the drywall's paper face. You want it depressed but not break the paper.


I learned from a drywall hanger buddy that it's quicker to use nails along the perimeter [enough to hold the board in place] and then switch to screws. Nail pops shouldn't be an issue since they will be covered with tape.
 

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In the first place, why on earth would you remove all the drywall from your house?
In the second place, you're almost always better off letting your drywall guy do the whole job..hanging the board and finishing. I don't know any tapers who like to finish an amateur drywall job.
In the third place, and this should have been first, I would not use drywall at all. I'd hire a plasterer who will hang blueboard and finish it with skim coat plaster.
It will cost you about the same when it's all said and done. It will be much faster..you don't have to apply three coats with a day of drying between coats. It's much cleaner because there is no sanding. And you get a MUCH better finished product because the entire board is coated with hard plaster, not just the joints and screws.
Get an estimate from a few drywall guys and then get a few from some plasterers. I'm betting you'll go with plaster.
But if you insist on drywall and mud just let them do the whole job. No one wants to try to make someone else's board work look good.
 

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In the first place, why on earth would you remove all the drywall from your house?
In the second place, you're almost always better off letting your drywall guy do the whole job..hanging the board and finishing. I don't know any tapers who like to finish an amateur drywall job.
In the third place, and this should have been first, I would not use drywall at all. I'd hire a plasterer who will hang blueboard and finish it with skim coat plaster.
It will cost you about the same when it's all said and done. It will be much faster..you don't have to apply three coats with a day of drying between coats. It's much cleaner because there is no sanding. And you get a MUCH better finished product because the entire board is coated with hard plaster, not just the joints and screws.
Get an estimate from a few drywall guys and then get a few from some plasterers. I'm betting you'll go with plaster.
But if you insist on drywall and mud just let them do the whole job. No one wants to try to make someone else's board work look good.
I will agree with you on evert thing except the cost it will mostly double or on the OP's location it could triple.
 

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In the first place, why on earth would you remove all the drywall from your house?

I have done it to insulate an old home.


No one wants to try to make someone else's board work look good.
That is certainly not true. A good finisher can work miracles with just about any installation, poor or excellent.
 

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It's true that a good finisher can make most any hang job look nice BUT he may not be willing to do the extra work that would require extra pay that the homeowner might not want to part with.
 

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Why would you insulate the outside walls. They are only so thick. You may get R-2 out of all that work. Fill the gaps around cheap vinyl windows, insulate the attic really well. Seal all openings in the attic. Seal well around all the doors. But adding insulation to vertical walls is a waste. Warm and cool air move vertically, not horizontally. I live in a house that is 130 years old. We have the original plaster walls, and would never destroy them to insulate. The plaster walls have about R-7 resistance. If you have wood windows, rebuild them and use bronze guides. This house stays a comfortable 68 average year around without heat or cooling.
 

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I found this set of videos on it quite informative and useful (open in Youtube to see the playlist) -

(and decided I'll let someone else do it so I don't hurt myself :p)
 

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I make a T with a long and a short 2x4. Screw a 2x4 cleat on the wall studs down from the ceiling a little. Lift a board, stick one end in the slot on top of the cleat, then put the T under it to hold the sheet while you fasten it.
1/2” works everywhere unless you have some weird framing over 24” on center.
Cut over the top of doors in the middle of a sheet. If you put a seam in line with a door edge slamming the door might crack it.
 
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In the third place, and this should have been first, I would not use drywall at all. I'd hire a plasterer who will hang blueboard and finish it with skim coat plaster.
Yeah, try and find a good affordable plasterer outside New England!

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Why would you insulate the outside walls. They are only so thick. You may get R-2 out of all that work.
No, an uninsulated 2x4 wall (with good air sealing and no windows) is R-2. Wall cavity insulation is R13 to R15. Exterior foam is a different story altogether as it's real purpose is to minimize the risk of condensation inside the wall with that R4/inch.
The plaster walls have about R-7 resistance.
No, plaster and lathe layer has an R value of 0.25, so your R-7 magic plaster would need to be about 14 inches thick to achieve R7.
Fill the gaps around cheap vinyl windows, insulate the attic really well. Seal all openings in the attic. Seal well around all the doors.
Great advice. Air sealing can make a big difference in comfort. I'd agree that it's more important than just insulating, especially if the insulation is fiberglass. Air seal in the attic first.
But adding insulation to vertical walls is a waste. Warm and cool air move vertically, not horizontally.
Well, we should have fixed the air movement with the air sealing, but heat radiates and will go through an uninsulated wall with little resistance (the R in R value!). With a big temperature differential the wall insulation will keep a lot more heat in the house. On a cold day that uninsulated wall will feel cold. That's why the building code mandates insulation in the walls of new construction.
If you have wood windows, rebuild them and use bronze guides.
Single pane wood windows can be improved to slow or stop drafts, but the temperature differential will make that whole area around the window feel cold and can even create convective loops that feel like a draft.
This house stays a comfortable 68 average year around without heat or cooling.
IN NORTH CAROLINA!! Try that in Minnesota in winter. Also, most houses probably aren't as well sited and designed as yours.
 

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Oh yeah, forgot to point out that HandyAndy does have a point about where to spend your money and effort to maximize the comfort level inside your home. Ripping out all the walls just to insulate might not be the best bang for your buck. Get an energy audit and see what they say before you start smashing up your drywall.
 

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I recently hung the equivalent of 180 sheets of drywall. Lots of 4x10's and 4x12's. All 5/8". Hanging drywall is hell. I quit going to the gym and started drinking lots of IPA. I'm glad I did it only b/c I learned a lot about hanging drywall and won't get ripped off when I hire a drywaller for my next project. Also, my framing will improve after hanging that much drywall.

My advice would be :
1) Hire a drywaller. Here in Brooklyn NY they charge $10-12 a sheet. If that's the true cost of hanging drywall I was crazy to do it myself.
2. If you're going to do it yourself - buy a rotozip to cut out the outlets, doors and windows.
3. Buy a drywall lift. You'll be able to sell it when you're done. It's great for the ceiling and the top row of wall sheetrock. Allowing you to work solo a lot. Also buy one of those orange panel carry tools. Like $10.
4. I bot a ridgid drywall gun but stopped using it after day one. The impacter with a #2 screw bit worked great. The drywall bit that has a stop on it rips the paper.

Hopefully you have some friends.

I'm interviewing tapers now b/c there's no way I'd tape this place myself.

Good luck.
 

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  • Rent a lift/hoist from Home Depot.
  • Get 2 small drywall lifts you can use with your feet to but the bottom wall sheet up to the top wall sheet.
  • Use 12' boards. Your butt joints should always be factory edge to factory edge.
  • Keep butt joints as far away from each other as possible. Or at least a few studs way.
  • DO NOT USE AN IMPACT GUN! Buy or rent a real drywall screw gun. You pull the trigger and push and the clutch will save you.
  • A drywall router is by far the best way to cut out electrical outlets, but you may hang 100 boards before you get the hang of it. If you use one, stick the bit in the middle of the box/high hat go the edge. Pull the bit out of the drywall slightly and find the outside edge. Then go counter clockwise around the box. This way you're going against the spinning of the bit and it helps the router not run on you. Don't cut all your electrical wires!
  • The hire a plaster guy comment was funny. Probably 4x the cost.
  • They're called rockers, hangers, tapers, finishers, idiots ... depending on the region!
  • You can put a few nails in the parameter of the board to hold it until you start screwing. Gluing and screwing is the best way to go.
  • Put your ceiling up first. You can give yourself a 1/4" play on your edges so you're not trimming/fighting every board. The next sheet will cover it.
  • Buy a drywall wrasp to take down any edges on the piece you cut.
  • Buy a T-Square.
  • Score the front of the board completely. Break it. Score the back as much as possible. Then you can quickly pull the board back towards the original cut and snap it clean. Watch a few videos.
  • If you have to run any boards along a slab, keep the drywall a good 1/2 inch off the slab. It will draw moisture out of the concrete and you don't want that.
 
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