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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I dont know the first thing about this stuff. Please explain things VERY simply for me.

Edit: Here was supposed to be a pic of the issue. The forum wont let me post a link, even in a reply. So it's going to be way harder to explain this. Basically some drywall above my shower surround, has become corrupted/rotted. Not a lot and it's not terrible.




Edit2: I put a space on both sides of the colon in the url to get around the link filter. If you can past that in your browser and remove the two spaces, that will work.


Now I've been living in this house about 8 years and this problem has slowly worsened. Honestly dont remember if the beginnings were there when I moved in.

Basically I noticed water is bouncing off my head from the shower and getting that corrupted area wet on every shower. eventually obviously it decayed. The shower surround is only maybe 6 feet tall and I am 5'8".

I dont know how to fix it though, I know vaguely I can cut out that section and sort of patch in a new one, but I saw a easier fix on youtube where the guy just peeled off all the peeling sections, plastered joint compound all over the area, then sprayed orange peel texture, painted or whatever. So, that was my plan. However, I am thinking that as long as the area keeps getting wet, no repair is going to last without some kind of protection? Am I wrong or right about that?

So next question is, if the answer to the above is i am right, how can i go about protecting that small area from the splashing water? I was thinking of just putting a single row of tile above the surround on that side only. But I dont know how to do that either, step by step Do I need to put redgard first? Will redgard create a mold trap? Is there already a water barrier behind this drywall?

Also, is this stuff around my shower the "cement backer board" people talk about, or is it just drywall? It looks exactly like the drywall in the adjacant bedroom, but I cant imagine the builders didn't take anti-water precautions, right?

So again, being a dummy newb, from the very beginning,, how should I approach this repair? And please go slow and dont speak jargon in your explanation...thanks!
 

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retired painter
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Cement board is used behind tile in wet locations, not really suitable for painting.
If the drywall is soft, I'd replace it. Peeling off the paper, priming with Zinnser's Gardz or any oil base primer before adding mud as needed will often work although the odds are the drywall won't be as strong as it once was.

The top of the surround should be caulked to the drywall. The drywall should have a good coat or two of latex enamel. That normally protects the wall above the surround well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is "mud", joint compound?

And the primer would go beneath the mud?

Thanks that already cleared up a lot of my total confusion.

If I replace the drywall I can cut out the bad section and patch it sort, right? I dont need to do the whole wall or anything?

You are right the drywall was caulked. At some point the defenses failed though.

But it's ok if the area gets repeatedly wet? I mean not soaked, but every shower it gets wet from water bouncing off the showeree's head.

I edited in a pic if you wanted to see the situation exactly.
 

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retired painter
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Mud is a slang term for the joint compound. The 2 main types of j/c are the regular ready mix [comes in a box or bucket] and setting compounds like Durabond. Regular ready mix mud is more novice friendly.

It's best to cut off the loose paper, if you pull - even more will come off. The primer prevents the surrounding paper from getting loose from the moisture in the j/c. If you opt to replace, you don't need to replace the whole wall, just the section that is damaged. Securing the patch piece to the wall is the main thing. You can either cut it back to a stud or screw a piece of wood [most anything that fits] to sound drywall leaving some wood exposed to screw the patch piece to.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, let me get the steps straight. Unless it's advised against, I think I'm going to try peeling off the stuff and mudding it first. If that ends up not holding, I can always patch later.

So the steps woud be: peel off the old stuff. Prime with Gardz. spackle mud.

Ok here I get confused, the rest of the wall has orange peel texture. You also mentioned two coats of latex enamel. So do I spray on the texture before or after painting?

So the steps are like, peel, prime, mud, prime again, paint, then texture last?

Seems like this is going to be tough to get to match the existng wall perfectly, but oh well I guess. Not a huge deal.
 

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If it were me....

I would use a sharp knife, utility knife, the stanley 99E's are nice... hint hint...

and cut about an inch above the damaged area, and THEN remove the damaged drywall.

Then, I have options... depending on how bad it is, I could fit in a piece of green board...or fill it with durabond (brown bag)

Durabond goes almost as hard as basecoat plaster... you mix it to the consistancy of pancake mix, try to keep the lumps out of it, but it doesnt have to be buttery smooth, if its too watery, add more powder... to stiff it up a bit.

put that on, so its below the the surface of the surrounding drywall... if its too watery it will slouch in the hole...

once thats done, then I would switch over to the white bag, easy sand, or the stuff in the green pail...

2-3 coats, lightly sand.

then hit that area with some Sherwin WIlliams oil base problock hs...

then spot prime my patch with 1 coat of Sherwin WIlliams superpaint, and then repaint the whole bathroom...

the orange peel you see is actually roller stiple... its the finish a roller makes on walls...

youll need to add like 5-10 coats of paint to remake that stipple...lol

also, if you tape the top of the shower surround itll be easier clean up...

and caulk the joint between the top of the shower and the wall...

and DO NOT wash your tools off in a sink, go outside and do it on the lawn with a hose. drywall compound will set under water.
 

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retired painter
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If you try to salvage what you have - cut the paper, then peel. If you just pull on the paper too much will come off.

Ok here I get confused, the rest of the wall has orange peel texture. You also mentioned two coats of latex enamel. So do I spray on the texture before or after painting?
Texture is applied after the mud work is done. Make sure the repair is level/even, remove dust and then texture. You can buy aerosol cans of orange peel texture.

Personally I like using Durabond but it's a bear to sand and might not be a great choice for a novice. I usually use ready mix mud out of a bucket for the final coat as it is easy to sand. Often diyers will apply the mud too thick resulting in too much sanding. I'd rather apply an extra coat of mud than do any extra sanding.

DO NOT wash your tools off in a sink, go outside and do it on the lawn with a hose. drywall compound will set under water.
Worth repeating!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I (tentatively) think I'm gonna go ahead and cut out the affected section out rather than the peeling thing. It seems like a more quality repair that way. Hopefully I can handle that! There are lots of guides online as well as the help in the above posts.

So on top of the repair I go mud, texture, primer (Gardz), then paint?
 

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Gardz is only needed if there is ripped paper/exposed gypsum. Souldn't need it if you are replacing the damaged drywall. Basically you'd secure the patch piece of drywall, tape the joints [be sure to let it dry good before applying next coat of mud] add joint compound as needed [usually 2-3 coats] sand smooth, remove dust, texture, prime and paint. Most any latex primer will work. The finish paint should be latex enamel [any sheen] a bath paint is even better.
 
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