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Ok so I need help finding an adapter that will take the dryer cable I have now and adapt it to fit the outlet in our house we just moved to. Apparently no one makes the partictular adapter I need after searching online for the past 30 minutes. I'm including pics for reference. If anyone can tell me what to look for or god forbid if I have to get the dryer rewired with a new cable that fits. PLEASE HELP!
 

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Ok so I need help finding an adapter that will take the dryer cable I have now and adapt it to fit the outlet in our house we just moved to. Apparently no one makes the partictular adapter I need after searching online for the past 30 minutes. I'm including pics for reference. If anyone can tell me what to look for or god forbid if I have to get the dryer rewired with a new cable that fits. PLEASE HELP!
Your first picture shows a NEMA 14-30 plug for the clothes dryer.
Your second picture shows a NEMA 10-50 socket.

If you as
replace the 4 wire cord with a 3 wire cord.
you should have 240 V to operate the heating facilities of the dryer BUT you may not have a Neutral connection, which MAY be required to operate the 120 V control (motor [?]) activities of this dryer. If you DO have these facilities, the "Grounding" of your dryer will be via the Neutral.

For information on this, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector : -
"As commonly used, 10-30 and 10-50 plugs have the frame of the appliance grounded through the neutral blade. This was a legal grounding method under the National Electrical Code for electric ranges and electric clothes dryers from the 1947 to the 1996 edition. Since North American dryers and ranges have certain parts (timers, lights, fans, etc.) that run on 120 V, this means that the wire used for grounding is also carrying current. Although this is contrary to modern grounding practice, such installations remain common in the United States and are relatively safe, because the larger conductors used are less likely to be broken than the smaller conductors used in ordinary appliance cords, and the current carried on the neutral conductor is small."

Having considered the above, you may wish to engage the services of a competent electrical contractor to change the socket concerned to a NEMA 14-30, which will supply 240 V (plus 120 V, via the Neutral), together with an actual "Ground" connection to the frame of the dryer.

Note that the plug which you have requires a maximum of "only" 30 A while the socket which you have should be capable of supplying 50 A. Hence, there should be no electrical supply problem in replacing this socket - apart from the need to connect to the Neutral.
 

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Your first picture shows a NEMA 14-30 plug for the clothes dryer.
Your second picture shows a NEMA 10-50 socket.

If you as
you should have 240 V to operate the heating facilities of the dryer BUT you may not have a Neutral connection, which MAY be required to operate the 120 V control (motor [?]) activities of this dryer. If you DO have these facilities, the "Grounding" of your dryer will be via the Neutral.

For information on this, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector : -
"As commonly used, 10-30 and 10-50 plugs have the frame of the appliance grounded through the neutral blade. This was a legal grounding method under the National Electrical Code for electric ranges and electric clothes dryers from the 1947 to the 1996 edition. Since North American dryers and ranges have certain parts (timers, lights, fans, etc.) that run on 120 V, this means that the wire used for grounding is also carrying current. Although this is contrary to modern grounding practice, such installations remain common in the United States and are relatively safe, because the larger conductors used are less likely to be broken than the smaller conductors used in ordinary appliance cords, and the current carried on the neutral conductor is small."

Having considered the above, you may wish to engage the services of a competent electrical contractor to change the socket concerned to a NEMA 14-30, which will supply 240 V (plus 120 V, via the Neutral), together with an actual "Ground" connection to the frame of the dryer.

Note that the plug which you have requires a maximum of "only" 30 A while the socket which you have should be capable of supplying 50 A. Hence, there should be no electrical supply problem in replacing this socket - apart from the need to connect to the Neutral.
The 3 wire dryer receptacle is a 120/240 device. It provides both 120&240. It does not have a separate ground but grounds the frame of the dryer through the neutral. It is grandfathered under the NEC to be used with a 3 wire dryer cord.
 
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Good catch by Frodo on the 10-50r.

That 10-50r should be changed to either a 10-30r or a 14-30r depending on whether or not there is a ground wire in the cable. A 10-50 is not correct for a dryer circuit.

The circuit breaker needs to be checked for 30 amps. If its a 50 amp, it needs to be changed.
 

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Your post indicated that 120 might not be available with a 3 wire receptacle. I was stating that 120/240 was available.
That 10-50r should be changed to either a 10-30r or a 14-30r depending on whether or not there is a ground wire in the cable. A 10-50 is not correct for a dryer circuit.

The circuit breaker needs to be checked for 30 amps. If its a 50 amp, it needs to be changed.
I realize that I was in error concerning the Neutral and the availability of 120 V.
However, the passage which I quoted advises that 120 V and, hence, the Neutral IS available - it is a "real" Earth which is NOT available and the Neutral is required to be used as an Earth.

Personally, I would be quite concerned to use an appliance connected in that manner - especially in a "laundry" situation.
In the admittedly very remote possibility that the Neutral failed at any point, when switched on the appliance would not operate BUT the chassis would then be at 120 V AC with respect to any earthed object in the vicinity!
 
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