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As brake pad material is vaporized by the heat of intensive spirited driving it produces gasses that have to escape to reduce brake fade. Drilled and/or slotted rotors help to vent those gasses. For a plain Jane daily driver it will be hard to notice a difference. The brakes will feel better simply because new pads and rotors are present. Drilled/slotted can result in slightly shorter pad life because they wipe off pad material faster. That, too, is hard to quantify because so many cars with d/s rotors are driven and braked harder. My pickup warps OEM plain rotors in about 20k miles so I might try d/s because they don’t cost more and pads are a cheap half hour job, just to see what happens. If your friend drives hard and lives in mountain country, why not? For my old man flat land driving I don’t expect to notice better braking other than maybe better warp resistance but I have no proof of that. It is flat here, we can see a mile down the road, and we roll out to a stop and hardly use the brakes.
 
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Reactions: gkreamer

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Mine are warped, no doubt about it. I frequently towed a landscape trailer that is a little under 3000 lbs. with the mower on it so brakes are not required. I think it stressed my brakes too much. Last year I gave that trailer to my son and I bought one with brakes and it helped.
 
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Reactions: SW Dweller

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We had a Dodge Caravan that ate pads and rotors every 25K miles. Now my wife has a Mustang convertible and it’s large brakes last almost forever.
 

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I put a run out gauge on them and quantify the warpage.
 

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Brakes pulsate, I buy new rotors. I don’t care whether it is brake pad deposits or warpage.
 

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If I have a choice, I buy expensive pads and cheap rotors. Then they are both shot at the same time.
 

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Some OEM brakes are good/perform well and some are the opposite. Often it has to do with the size of the brakes, not their actual quality. I had a Dodge minivan, the kind of car intended to load with the family and stuff. It had small brakes that stopped the car, but never lasted over about 25k miles. Now my wife has a 6 cylinder Mustang convertible. Since it is supposed to be a sporty kind of car, it has way bigger brakes than I expected, and it is not a car that has room for lots of people or cargo. At 60k miles I replaced the brakes because they were glazed and rumbled, but they still looked like new with very little wear.
 
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