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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
My wife and I recently bought a house with a sump pit but no pump. The inspector told us we could drain a dehumidifier into it, so we have the setup in the attached image. Since we don't really understand what's happening here, we thought we'd better double check that this is indeed o.k. and that we're doing it properly. Any feedback would be appreciated!


Thanks,
Justin
 

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retired framer
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Hello,
My wife and I recently bought a house with a sump pit but no pump. The inspector told us we could drain a dehumidifier into it, so we have the setup in the attached image. Since we don't really understand what's happening here, we thought we'd better double check that this is indeed o.k. and that we're doing it properly. Any feedback would be appreciated!


Thanks,
Justin
The white on the concrete looks like the salts that water will bring out of the concrete.

Can you remove the lid and see what pipes if any enter or exit it?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Nealtw,
Thanks for the quick response. Opening the lid was a bit of a revelation -- filled with water! Should I take this as an indication that the water is not draining anywhere?



If I need to get a pump installed, is that a job for a plumber or a "basement specilialist"?
 

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No reason you cannot install a pump yourself make sure you install a check valve on the discharge and run it to your storm downspouts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Ghostmaker! To be honest, my skills are pretty low. Is installing a pump pretty straightforward?
 

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So long as the fat pipes dumping into the pit are not more than about 2/3 covered the water can stay that way with or without a sump pum.

The purpose of a sump pump pit is to accumulate a quantity of ground water percolating out of the soil so a pump can expel decent quantities in short infrequent bursts instead of small quantities every few seconds.
 
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retired framer
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Oh, that is happy news. Always happy to let sleeping dogs lie :)
If you live on a hill side one of those pipes might be taking the water away.

I would keep an eye on the height of the water after a rain.

Some one spent a lot of work and or money to get it this far. The pump if needed is the easy stuff.
 

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A previous city subdivision-built house we owned had a pit with no pump. We were later told that the city building code mandated it, which probably made sense when most of the city was near a lake, but then expanded up the sandy surrounding hills. Ours was bone dry.
The skim of dust suggests to me that the water has been there for a very long time, possibly since the floor was finished before the lid went on. I would keep an eye on it over seasons and weather event and see what happens (we don't know how old the house is). Adding a pump can pretty simple depending on the where's and how's of the discharge line; you have to move it away from your foundation but not impact on neighbours. Whether you can run it into municipal storm drains, run it to the curb, etc. depends on local rules.
 

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I would consider getting a water leak detector and just sitting it on top or adjacent, to let you know if the pit ever actually fills up.
 

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Installing a pump isn't hard, but you also have to drill a hole in the side of the house and pipe in the pump to the outside with 1 1/2" pvc.
 
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