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Hi, we are looking for some advice on double glazing windows for sound reduction. We are moving to our new home next month and one of my concerns is the noise on the road we are moving to. Our current home is in a quiet area and the home we have found and fallen in love with is in the main road. It’s an old house and we just love the traditional look of it. There is currently double glazing present ,fitted many years ago so not modern anyways. What we need is a trendy but traditional look :). The current noise level is not something we could adjust and live with. While studying I found that replacing the frames and windows with laminated and larger space between the panes will reduce the noise, so thinking to get the new windows from Landmark windows. What are your suggestions? Can I add secondary glazing after this if needed?
Thank you.
 

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The keys to STC are airspace, mass, and offset glazing.

I didn't read anything about that on their page but airspace is only one of the 3 keys to controlling noise transmission. Without the other two working in tangent, you won't get much positive impact.

Lamination will help as a vibration damper to the noise. Be sure they specify it on the exterior lite of the window.
 

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The current noise level is not something we could adjust and live with.
Respectfully , you may have to ! Installing new windows (w/laminated GLASS ???*) will be a MAJOR expense that may not solve the problem ! **

* I have been repairing all types of windows for over 30 years & don't recall ever seeing a conventional residential casement , hung , or awning sash w/laminated glass . It is normally used in commercial or special safety applications & would add considerable weight to a normal sash .

** You could spend......$1000 per window ??? , and then discover the walls are allowing comparable noise penetration ..........



http://www.diychatroom.com//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/extension/
 

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My brother lives a on a busy road. We installed Andersen 400 series double hungs and it was like night and day. The noise was imperceptible in the house. He owned a old farm house built in about 1915. These windows did not have any special glazing other then low e glass..
 

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Dennish:

I would forget about investing in new windows. Spend your money on stuff that will work better, like heavy shutters on the outside of the windows (that you can open and close from inside the house) and heavy fabric (think "carpet") curtains on the inside of the windows. Those two things will stop more noise than a second pane of glass.

Essentially, sound and noise are nothing more than pressure waves in the air. Pressure waves don't travel through walls. When a sound wave hits a wall (or shutter or curtain) the sound wave makes the wall move slightly, and the movement of the wall reproduces another sound wave on the opposite side of the wall. It is the reproduced sound wave that you hear, not the original. (Now, the preceeding isn't strictly true for curtains because sound can travel around curtains.)

It is this "simple as mud" method by which sound propogates through walls that gives rise to the "Mass Law" of accoustics. Simply stated, the Mass Law says that for every doubling of either the mass of a wall per unit area, or for every doubling of the frequency of the noise hitting the wall, the sound pressure on the opposite side of the wall is reduced by 6 decibels, or to 1/4 of it's former value.

And, the mass law is intuitively easy to understand. The heavier the wall, the less it moves in response to a sound wave. Think of it this way, which is easier to push; a Volkswagen or a garbage truck? Obviously, the VW. So, the greater the mass of the wall, the less it moves in response to a sound wave, and the smaller the amplitude of the reproduced sound wave that's produced by movement of the wall. The smaller the amplitude of a sound wave, the lower it's air pressure and the quieter it is.

Similarily, as the frequency of a sound wave increases, the ability of the wall to respond to that sound wave is limited by the wall's inertia. The greater the inertia of the wall, the less able it is to change it's direction of motion fast enough to reproduce the sound wave hitting it.

So, if you've ever lived in an apartment block and you hear someone playing their stereo too late at night, you don't hear the music. Instead, you hear BOOM-BOOM-BOOM. What's happening is that the inertia of the walls and floors of the building are unable to reproduce the midrange and treble notes, and are only responding to the bass notes. That is, the higher freqencies are being filtered out by the inertia of the building walls and floors. It is only when you get close enough to the offending tenant's apartment to bang your fist on his door that you can hear those higher frequencies and recognize the song that's playing on his stereo.

Now, also, the Mass Law states that for every doubling of the mass of the wall per square foot or square meter or square whatever, or for every doubling of the frequency of the noise hitting the wall, the reproduced sound wave on the other side of the wall is 6 decibel quieter, or it's sound pressure level is reduced to 1/4 of it's original value. But, our ears don't hear things that way. Our ears are very much more sensitive to quiet sounds than they are to loud noises. So, while the sound pressure level of the reproduced sound wave is reduced to 1/4 of that of the original sound wave, it doesn't seem like that much of a reduction to our ears. And, that's simply because our ears are far more sensitive to quiet sounds than loud noise.

Anyhow, one of the most effective ways of reducing noise is by putting something with a lot of inertia between you and the source of the noise, and heavy shutters and heavy drapes will reduce noise more effectively than a second pane of glass in your windows.

Similarily, older homes with plaster walls are much quieter to live in than newer homes with 3/8 inch drywall on 2X3 studs. People who stay in hotels in the past never had a problem with noise transmission between different rooms. Now, with light weight construction materials, like metal wall studs, people staying in new modern hotels can hear the people in the room next to them as well as they can hear people in the same room as them.

If you ever buy a condo, buy one with concrete floors and concrete block fire separation walls around each condo. You won't hear squat from your neighbors.
 

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Dennish:

I would forget about investing in new windows. Spend your money on stuff that will work better, like heavy shutters on the outside of the windows (that you can open and close from inside the house) and heavy fabric (think "carpet") curtains on the inside of the windows. Those two things will stop more noise than a second pane of glass.
Or, you could sell the house and move into a bunker or underground cave.
It will be very, very quiet.
 

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Hi, we are looking for some advice on double glazing windows for sound reduction. We are moving to our new home next month and one of my concerns is the noise on the road we are moving to. Our current home is in a quiet area and the home we have found and fallen in love with is in the main road. It’s an old house and we just love the traditional look of it. There is currently double glazing present ,fitted many years ago so not modern anyways. What we need is a trendy but traditional look :). The current noise level is not something we could adjust and live with. While studying I found that replacing the frames and windows with laminated and larger space between the panes will reduce the noise, so thinking to get the new windows from Landmark windows. What are your suggestions? Can I add secondary glazing after this if needed?
Thank you.
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