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I have a double steel front entry door where the left door opens normally, but the right door is secured by pins (flush bolts?) at the top and bottom into the door frame and threshold. The pins ride in a track and are just held in by friction.

So the issue I have is whoever installed these doors drilled a pretty large hole in the top of the door frame, so when the door slams, the pin moves in the hole and slides down, keeping the door unsecured.

Is there another solution that will keep this from happening? I tried a magnet under the pin, but it was not strong enough and slid down.
 

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Pics would help. I have double doors as well, except mine are wood. They are secured just as you described. I hate them and plan on replacing them with a single door with sidelights. Anyway, is it possible to use a router and cut a clean rectangle in the door frame around the area with the hole, and then using glue and some screws, filling in that area with a new piece of wood and then drilling a properly sized hole?
 

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The pins ride in a track and are just held in by friction.
I have the same set-up, and never had a problem with not enough friction. If anything, too tight if I ever want to pull the pin down. Maybe that's just because its 25 years old.

You might want to try taking the cover off the track to see if there is anything in there that is supposed to provide friction. If not, maybe try putting some folded paper or tape to make it a little tighter.
 

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The top and bottom bolts on my doors have a lever that is pulled away from the door and flips up or down depending on whether you want the pins extended or not.

See on Amazon the "Sumnacon 2 Pcs Door Flush Bolt - 6 Inch Concealed Security Door Lock for French Doors,Composite Doors,Wood Doors,Double Doors,Dummy Doors,Brush Stainless Steel Finish" for an example.

A good carpenter could make the upgrade for you. If the hole was drilled too large at the top or bottom I would expect that the bolt plates would fix the problem. The trick is trying to find true carpenters to do such work after the banksters trashed the economy for workers in 2008.
 

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Normally the flush bolt assembly in the door corner provides all of the friction and/or locking needed, and the plate and hole in the middle of the door lintel and threshold is not responsible.
 
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