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Interesting. Not my style, but my comments are not shaded by that.

I have never seen a dust collector above the saw blade, I can’t imagine it collects much. Wouldn’t it be better below the table?
Glad you finally mentioned the issue of the length of the brad nail, however i think you should have used a 15 ga nailer rather than 18.
Glue was not applied properly, the simple squiggle should have spread out, and applied to both pieces of wood.
I would have used a backerboard to provide a flat stable continuous structure. Something as simple as a piece of 1/4” exterior ply would work. Or thicker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not sure I agree with all your comments, but thanks.

Not sure why you have not seen a dust collector on he top. I have seen it many times (google it). I got this from a professional who upgraded.
It makes a big difference. I actually have it below and on the top. I recommend it.

Yeah I used the largest nails for my nailer. I could have used longer ones, these were a bit short. How can you tell which ones i used? Good eye

Imagine gluing both sides on this project... I feel satisfied with more glue on one side and using clamps.
Nothing against 2 sided application though

Backer board. The cedar door has the 3points of cross support which do the trick.
The hardwood door I built close to 7 years ago and has absolutely no extra support and has had no problems.
Why add the extra weight if it's not needed? Plus it looks great from behind
 

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I like the doors. Definitely cool it’s built from scrap wood. You definitely do not need a backer board and it would ruin one side.

When I was in college many many years ago I worked in a wood shop that made high end oak furniture. When I was first learning to make a long oak dining table they took elmers wood glue and glued 8 1 ft wide pieces of oak together to make an 8ft table. At first I thought they were joking and messing with the new guy (me). I said there is no way you glue the wood together. The headguy made me glue 2 1 ft wide and 2 inch thick pieces together along the 2 inch side so it was 2 ft wide. The next day he gave me a hammer and said break it. I learned that the board would break anywhere except where it was glued. The glued seam was the strongest part.
We did not even use brad nails. We just glued it up and used clamps to hold it tight until it dried. We sold many $6k tables that had nothing but glue holding them together. they Had some in the showroom that were 20 years old and still perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah that is a great test to do early on when working with wood I would think. I just repurposed a stare for my basement. I had to take some of it apart from the old location and it was very rare that it would come apart due to the glue failure. It was the wood that always broke. And yes I default to the brad nailer just to save time.
Ooh oak tables, sounds nice
 

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Very nice - now I know to always save my scraps! And could be a good excuse to get a new thickness planer...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very nice - now I know to always save my scraps! And could be a good excuse to get a new thickness planer...
Nice! too much waste these days in my opinion. oooh a planer/Joiner, wish I had the space and money...
I ran the hardwood one over a joiner at a friends and man the back was so nice and smooth...
 

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Why add the extra weight if it's not needed? Plus it looks great from behind
The net effect would not necessarily be heavier, but it would be stronger. The face boards could be resawn, or planed down, to 1/4” or less for the thin ones, up to maybe 1/2” for the thick ones, and then glued to the center board on both sides. Wrap the whole assembly with solid wood edging. That would be for the interior door.

For the shed, adding a second cleat near the bottom and securing both with screws rather than brads would add a lot of strength and keep it from warping.
 

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Very nice job and the finish came out terrific as well. Most people would be hard press to tell it is made from scrap.

I think we need to change that name from "scrap lumber" to something like "secondary project lumber" or "renewal lumber" Think of the things one can build with a little imagination using just the excess lumber laying around the shop.

With a little bit of effort, one can often find really nice pallets that can be repurposed with no one the wiser.

I read somewhere that depending on where it is coming from, often Kubota equipment is shipped on pallets made from mahogany. It does not look like much as a pallet but after being planed and finished looks quite beautiful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Very nice job and the finish came out terrific as well. Most people would be hard press to tell it is made from scrap.

I think we need to change that name from "scrap lumber" to something like "secondary project lumber" or "renewal lumber" Think of the things one can build with a little imagination using just the excess lumber laying around the shop.

With a little bit of effort, one can often find really nice pallets that can be repurposed with no one the wiser.

I read somewhere that depending on where it is coming from, often Kubota equipment is shipped on pallets made from mahogany. It does not look like much as a pallet but after being planed and finished looks quite beautiful.
Mahogany, wow! good find!
Renewal Lumber! Nice! Yeah, i guess lumber is Lumber... yeah that shed i made the door for was from shipping materials too.
 
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