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Learning by Doing
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Doorbells usually have a transformer. A non-contact voltage tester easily pick up phantom voltage. Kill the main if you are really worried. I'd look for the transformer and trace it back to find the right breaker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I have found the transformer. It is stuck to the side of an octagonal junction box nearby. I see the wires coming out of the load side that must go to the chime.

My new chime isn't quite working. It's a two note chime, and it makes the second note but while it is trying to make the first note it just buzzes quietly a bit. It says it needs 16 VAC but my transformer is measuring 12 VAC with my multimeter. Is that my problem?
 

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Do not install illuminated doorbell buttons or electronic chimes with a voltage rating less than what your transformer is delivering.

Mechanical chimes (with glockenspiel bars, hollow tubes, bells, etc.) can take a little overvoltage. Overvoltage may be needed to make the chime work if the wires are too thin or the distance to the door is too great. But an illuminated doorbell will still burn out if the voltage supplied is too great.
 
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