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Discussion Starter #1
hello,

I am new to the forum. I have an old home (built around 1900) that some previous owners have done some DIY with that was obviously not done correctly. For example the previous owners put in new outside doors, probably due to a suggestion by a Realtor.

I am not an expert but it is clear to me that these doors are not right. I'm not sure if this is something that is fixable or if I just need to replace these doors. The doors do not have any casing or molding installed, and the hinge framing is not even with the drywall inside. From the edge of the drywall the hinge framing goes in about an inch or so. Is this the case of a door that is just too small or is there a way to remedy this?

Thanks,
Brian
 

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Post picture.
 

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remodeling pro
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Speculation without a pic, but it sounds like some clueless person tried to install a modern width door jamb unit in a wall that is thicker than found in modern construction. It is not uncommon for older houses to have thicker walls than newer construction due to the dimensions of old, rough cut lumber vs modern dressed framing lumber, and the varying thickness of plaster jobs. If you want to save the units, thay will have to be removed and installed so that the hinge side of the jamb is flush with the wall surface, than you can add extensions to the other side to flush it out; then door casing as usual. If you want to replace the unit, use a lumber yard or mill supplier that will order custom width jambs on the unit. It will cost more, but is worth it IMO. Be sure to measure the wall thickness in at least 3 or 4 places and use the thickest dimension.
 

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thats minor.. this is really common. all you need is to rip some furring strips out some pine so you have a nailing surface for the casing

i say use pine because its far less likely to split than mdf when making thin pieces.. you can pin them directly to the door frame. just be sure to have a 1/4" reveal so the hinges can still operate smoothly
 

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Someone was to cheap to order jamb extentions or a wider jamb.
Get a measurement with something laying flat againt the wall to the jamb.
It's easyer for a DIY with few tools to just find a stock moulding that will extended it out.
Make sure to cut that foam out of the way first.
Make sure to predrill the holes and use finish nails that go into the jambs at least 1".
 

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Someone was to cheap to order jamb extentions or a wider jamb.
Get a measurement with something laying flat againt the wall to the jamb.
It's easyer for a DIY with few tools to just find a stock moulding that will extended it out.
Make sure to cut that foam out of the way first.
Make sure to predrill the holes and use finish nails that go into the jambs at least 1".


the house may have had foam put on the house and new siding installed.. doing so pushes out where the door will sit in relation to the wall so furring strips are a given
 

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I would never order jamb extensions.
Ask any carpenter about jamb extensions, will know what you are talking about.
But these are made and not bought.

when you measure, may find you need 1" at top and 3/4" at bottom.
Move to other side of door and the dimensions may change.
Is why you will not walk into a real hardware store and buy a jamb extension ... they will sell you the material to make one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the input, so overall I'm getting that I don't need to replace the doors to remedy the situation, I just need to bring the jamb flush with the drywall.

I can just cut the foam back, I put that in there myself to keep the drafts out until I get the door finished. Thanks for all the input everyone.

Brian
 

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