DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All!

I found this tool with a bunch of random hand tools that someone "gifted"me. I've internet searched my brains out, but came up empty. The only mark is the number 259 stamped in it, just below the insulation on the handle. The insulation appears to be fiberglass. (it's got the same texture as fire zone tape or varnished cambrick.)

My best guess it that is has something to do with punch down blocks. (Slot to push on, hook to remove?) And that's a wild guess.

Thanks For Your Input!
Paul
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks Guys!

Good, sharp eyes Lenaitch. I didn't notice the taper.

It kind of does look like a packing tool, SW Dweller,for removing oakum from lead/oakum joints, but tiny. Maybe that's how they plumbed the DWV in Barbie's Dream House?
Or, as you mentioned, steam joints which can be small on radiator valves. I'll ask one of my brothers who is a steam guy.

Your brad puller mention, 1865Wingate, was worth checking out. I couldn't make it work for that. But you made me think of pulling T-18 staples that phone people use. No luck.

Actually, that mess-o-rusty-tools had a couple of small, wooden spudger tools & a Yankee push drill (the jackpot in the bag). In the "way back" days, I used to see phone guys using Yankee drills. (Probably because they are handy as can be. I use it often.)
Maybe this is, indeed, a phone tool?

A different tool bag that a phone guy's widow gave to my wife decades ago had a very similar looking tool that I forgot about until now. It's pictured below.

Also in that bag was the wooden handled tool in the picture.
Squeezing the handle closes the barrel in the end a little bit. It doesn't grip anything well.

My only guess (and it's a stretch of the imagination) is maybe it's used to align & insert those pesky, little, "insert-on-end" spring loaded fuses found on some old phone system racks. (Pictured) It wouldn't have the grip strength to remove them.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,477 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Bird Doo Head

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys for solving the mystery!

The one does kind of look like a glazing point tool. It can certainly work for that job- prbably easier than a point tool.

How'd you figure out the lamp extractor FM3? I sure missed it when searching. It sure would have come in handy when I was building & repairing control panels. (I always seemed to bust the lamps when pulling them with mini duck bill pliers.)

Good thinking JoeD about it being a punch down tool. I tried both on the punch down block in my house. Neither fit over the terminals. Perhaps blocks came with different size terminals, or it was for use on stab-terminals inside equipment.
 

·
A "Handy Husband"
Joined
·
14,388 Posts
Thanks Guys!

Good, sharp eyes Lenaitch. I didn't notice the taper.

It kind of does look like a packing tool, SW Dweller,for removing oakum from lead/oakum joints, but tiny. Maybe that's how they plumbed the DWV in Barbie's Dream House?
Or, as you mentioned, steam joints which can be small on radiator valves. I'll ask one of my brothers who is a steam guy.

Your brad puller mention, 1865Wingate, was worth checking out. I couldn't make it work for that. But you made me think of pulling T-18 staples that phone people use. No luck.

Actually, that mess-o-rusty-tools had a couple of small, wooden spudger tools & a Yankee push drill (the jackpot in the bag). In the "way back" days, I used to see phone guys using Yankee drills. (Probably because they are handy as can be. I use it often.)
Maybe this is, indeed, a phone tool?

A different tool bag that a phone guy's widow gave to my wife decades ago had a very similar looking tool that I forgot about until now. It's pictured below.

Also in that bag was the wooden handled tool in the picture.
Squeezing the handle closes the barrel in the end a little bit. It doesn't grip anything well.

My only guess (and it's a stretch of the imagination) is maybe it's used to align & insert those pesky, little, "insert-on-end" spring loaded fuses found on some old phone system racks. (Pictured) It wouldn't have the grip strength to remove them.
In Post #6 the 2 items are a lamp extractor as others gave notes and flat spring relay contact adjuster. Both Telco related and my have a KS# imprinted them.

Sent from my SM-T500 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,688 Posts
How'd you figure out the lamp extractor FM3? I sure missed it when searching.
Surprisingly, I wasn't seeing anything about the fuse tool when looking up the fuses. And "install" tool wasn't helping. Of course, it's actually called an "extract" tool, and then comes up. I think I saw contact adjuster pictures first and one also had the extractor tool with its proper name listed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks FM3. Good Find!
Using the information from your post, i found an on-line catalog showing a similar tool. Same ends- Different shape shaft.

For fun, I opened an old Ricky & Lucy type that phone that I have and the smaller tool with slots sure does fit the ringer spring-arm contacts. (Now the bell works!)

I also have some open-case relays from an old Horizon system that I've used on science projects. The larger tool fit those spring arms.

Thanks Again Everyone! it's always a good day when something new is learned.
Paul
 

Attachments

1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top