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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In addition to turning off the power before working on light switches, I wear dishwashing gloves because I figure that they will protect against electrical shocks. Am I correct?
 

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I doubt they provide the protection you want. The gloves in my PPE gear are really thick and also i have to wear leather gloves over the rubber gloves. So I am going to say no.
 

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I'm pretty sure I'm going to have to test this, in the interest of Mad Science, but I'm thinking the thin rubber won't withstand 120V. I certainly wouldn't count on it. Besides, it's so thin that by the time you're halfway done making up a light switch box, there's probably at least one small hole or cut in the rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I figure it is still better than barehanded. Just a little extra insurance after cutting the house power and testing with a ohmmeter. Consider how thin electrical tape is.
 

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I figure it is still better than barehanded. Just a little extra insurance after cutting the house power and testing with a ohmmeter. Consider how thin electrical tape is.
WHY are you testing with an ohmmeter???

If you are that scared, even after killing the power and verifying that it is off, then you should not be messing with electrical work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you are that scared, even after killing the power and verifying that it is off, then you should not be messing with electrical work.
I would respectfully disagree. The people who are NOT paranoid about electrical shocks are the ones who should not be messing with electrical work.
 

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If you put one hand in your pocket and wear rubber soled boots (without nails) the chances of getting electrocuted are small.
The real danger of electricity is getting a poke and falling off a ladder.
 

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I wouldn't use gloves! The power is OFF! Simple to check if you are that paranoid. If anything gloves will make you clumsy and in my opinion that will only increase the chance that you slip and foul the wires.

Anyways to each his own.
 

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I would respectfully disagree. The people who are NOT paranoid about electrical shocks are the ones who should not be messing with electrical work.
And I will strongly disagree right back at 'cha.

If you are scared or paranoid AT ALL, PLEASE leave this to someone else who has respect for electricity, NOT fear.
 

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Call it respect or fear, whatever you want. The reality is, the only way to be sure to not get shocked is to not work on electrical systems. "Turning it off and verifying" is not always enough. I'll give you a story.

Working on my own house (a real rarity), I was moving a circuit from the service panel to the generator panel. I pulled the Romex from the panel and tested that it was dead. I was re-feeding the cable thru the ceiling joists and got shocked. After tracing it all thru, the cable was backfed from the two-gang box that had the disposal switch and the cabinet light switch. The backfeed only happened when the disposal was on. My wife just happened to switch it on while I was handling the cable.

Bottom line - don't touch wires if you don't want to get hurt. Anyone who is a professional electrician has probably been shocked more times than they can count. It comes with the learning process. The trick is to get the PPE when the situation presents the possibility of a serious shock injury (wet conditions, on a ladder, near grounded parts, etc.). I use a set of Class 1 rubber gloves when I feel they are needed and haven't been shocked in about 5 years.

Mark
 

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fabrk8r
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Electricity one of the few things we work with on a daily basis that is invisible. Air is another, but air won't usually hurt you.

Just because something is invisible doesn't mean you have to be scared of it or that you can't understand how it works.

It's my opinion that the reason people get shocked is because they are A: careless or B: ignorant (or a combination of both).

Hope I don't hurt anyone's feelings with this post, but before using any tool the user should take the time to understand how it works. Electricity is a tool.

Relying on 6 mil rubber kitchen gloves to protect yourself from shock is a futile attempt at safety and dangerous.
 
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You talking to me?
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But most electricians get shocked once in a while?
I try really hard to not get shocked, especially if you realize that any shock I get from common voltages can be lethal, I try to avoid getting shocked.

It does happen, yes. I can also tell you some situations where people were killed or seriously injured from common voltages and I am sure any electrician here can tell you more of the same types of stories.

while rubbermaid gloves will likely offer some protection simply because they are made from a insulating material, since they are not intended for this purpose, they have never been tested so you cannot be certain they will protect you from anything so what it comes down to: are you willing to risk your life because you think they might protect you?

That is an unknown I am not willing to accept. At least if I have bare hands, I know if I touch something hot, I will likely get shocked. If I am depending on something to protect me that may not, I will do things that I would not do if I thought I could get shocked. That is just foolish.
 

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Wire Chewer
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When I turn off the power I always do a quick finger check to double check that it REALLY is off before I grab hold of a wire. That's when the breaker is properly labeled, if I'm doing guess work I'll just test with a voltmeter.
 

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When I turn off the power I always do a quick finger check to double check that it REALLY is off before I grab hold of a wire. That's when the breaker is properly labeled, if I'm doing guess work I'll just test with a voltmeter.
Heh, I do the same thing. It's like checking for gas leaks with a match. Well, maybe a little less stupid than that. :thumbup:
 

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Learning by Doing
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I wear tight leather gloves when doing electric work, but ONLY TO PROTECT MY SKIN AGAINST NICKS and SCRATCHES.

I can't imagine doing any electrical work in dishwashing gloves. They're cumbersome for dishwashing.
 
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