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Problem Solver
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Discussion Starter #1
Just moved into a new house, and the laundry room door is about 4 feet away from the utility pole that provides the coax cable for internet service. So, I can literally plug my modem directly into the splitter at the top of the pole. However, I need to route this cable to a more practical location within the house, which means putting on a splitter and running the cable in the attic. Should this cable be grounded to something, like a piece of conduit or a water pipe? Or is that not necessary? I assume it's grounded at the pole, but should I ground it to something in the house just in case?
 

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Usually Confused
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My believe is yes, since you want all of the wiring in your house at the same ground level. I'm not really up on data networks, so I'm not sure simply plugging into the distributors equipment will even work and, if it does, whether it would be considered theft if they don't know about it. Up here, there is a network interface box on the house that delineates the point at which my ownership starts.
 

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You should/just ground the jack or stud on the first piece of your own equipment or equipment you pay a monthly fee for or equipment indoors (perhaps a splitter, perhaps a cable box) that the cable from cable company equipment fits/screws on.

Run a 14 or slightly larger wire from that jack down to the fat ground wire that comes out of your breaker panel headed for a ground rod or (if this wire exists exists) to a metal cold water pipe near where the latter exits the house underground.

While some folks have grounded to a radiator or a grounded receptacle or a pipe, there is a chance that this is not a good ground, for example there may be a section of plastic pipe between the pipe the wire was attached to and the rest of the plumbing in the basement.

Do not touch anything on the utility pole except for an item the cable company specifically told you to connect something to.
 

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Licensed electrician
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You do not ground coax to a radiator or a random piece of pipe or water line. It needs to connect to the service ground.
 

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The cable should be connected to a coax grounding block like this one before it enters the house. The grounding block should be connected to your electrical system ground rod or grounding electrode conductor.
Right. But I prefer using one that will accept multiple electrode conductors.
Like mine. There are at least two split bolts with data grounding electrode wires connected to them. A multi point connection would solve this jerry rig.
Cable guys do a crappy job. Its in your best interest to give them a place to land these wires.

It's usually the cable company's responsibility to set a point of entry connection box and ground the cable per code.
It is here for sure and see above. I have fixed their work on more than one occasion.
 

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Problem Solver
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Discussion Starter #9
I've never heard of a homeowner climbing a pole except in Green Acres.
Are you stealing the service?
No, I'm a subscriber. It wouldn't work even if I tried because the MAC address of the modem must be authorized on the cable company's end for an internet connection to be established.

I didn't need to climb the pole. The cable coming off the splitter on the pole was cut and left dangling off the side of the house from a previous install. Rather than pay to have a tech come and put an end on it and drill a hole in the side of my house, I just put my own end on it and connected it to the modem. But it really should be fished through an attic vent or otherwise routed into the attic so it can go where it needs to go inside the house.
 

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If you choose to extend it from the pole, and you want to play nice guy to the cable company, go to one of the big box stores and get some direct burial coax and and a double female F connector and run the cable over to the side of your house (near the electric or phone service if possible) and land it there. Bond it to the service ground at that point with a #12 bare or green copper.

Now you can run it wherever you like from there. Normally this is their work and should have already done and installed with an enclosure box for the connections and any future 0db amplifier/splitter, when/if needed.

It's your choice if you choose to do it yourself, but normally it's not allowed past the point of connection to your house.
 
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