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Discussion Starter #1
I have read many articles about installing Engineered Hardwood Flooring. We are going to be floating it and several articles say to remove the baseboards and others say you do not have to. What is the best way to do this? Also if we do remove the baseboards to we have to replace them?


Thank You.
 

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A whole lot less work and comes out great to leave them in place, just remove the 1/4 rd.
Yes if you remove the baseboard your going to replace them. There's going to gaps for the expantion and contraction of the floor that need to be covered.
 

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The choice is yours---If the shoe molding will cover the expansion gap required by the manufacturer--you are good.

I almost always remove and re-install or replace the base board---I hate the look of short base board---not to mention that the old base usually looks really old and tired next to the brand new floor---

But replacing is a personal choice---if you don't mind the look of the shorter base---leave it---
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Awesome, we just bought the house so I will have to take a a look at how tall the current baseboard is and make the decision.

Once we put the flooring down will it make it hard to replace the baseboards if we ever want to do that?

Thanks for the help!
 

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It will be harder because your going to have to pry the top away from the wall and cut off the lower nails in the bottom plate to get it out.
 
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emoving the base also gives you more room for miscutting---while you are planning this---figure in the cost of an undercut saw or a milti-tool--(Harbor Freight?)

You will need to slip the new floor under the door jambs and door casings----
 

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What I do is remove the baseboards, repair and refinish them, then reinstall them once the flooring is in. That's a lot of work, but the results look good (to me). Baseboards do get beat up and smudged over time. Filling in the holes, sanding them, and a couple coats of fresh paint make them look really nice.

Removing them is easy. Use a utility knife to break the seal with the walls (in case they were caulked or painted over). Then I like to use a putty knife worked between the wall and baseboards to start loosening them and prying them gently. Once I can get my mini pry bar in there, I can work them away from the wall more aggressively - careful to not damage the walls. Once they're loose, I yank 'em out by hand and trot them down to my bench for refurbishment.

You might want to consider painting the walls while you have your baseboards out and before your new flooring is installed. Easier job to do then, rather than later.

You don't have to do this, mind you. You still need to leave an expansion gap around the perimeter of your room, so how you do that is up to you. Removing and re-installing baseboards is easier than installing your flooring, IMO, so I find it silly to not do it.
 

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What I do is remove the baseboards, repair and refinish them, then reinstall them once the flooring is in. That's a lot of work, but the results look good (to me). Baseboards do get beat up and smudged over time. Filling in the holes, sanding them, and a couple coats of fresh paint make them look really nice.

Removing them is easy. Use a utility knife to break the seal with the walls (in case they were caulked or painted over). Then I like to use a putty knife worked between the wall and baseboards to start loosening them and prying them gently. Once I can get my mini pry bar in there, I can work them away from the wall more aggressively - careful to not damage the walls. Once they're loose, I yank 'em out by hand and trot them down to my bench for refurbishment.

You might want to consider painting the walls while you have your baseboards out and before your new flooring is installed. Easier job to do then, rather than later.

You don't have to do this, mind you. You still need to leave an expansion gap around the perimeter of your room, so how you do that is up to you. Removing and re-installing baseboards is easier than installing your flooring, IMO, so I find it silly to not do it.
 

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What I do is remove the baseboards, repair and refinish them, then reinstall them once the flooring is in. That's a lot of work, but the results look good (to me). Baseboards do get beat up and smudged over time. Filling in the holes, sanding them, and a couple coats of fresh paint make them look really nice.

Removing them is easy. Use a utility knife to break the seal with the walls (in case they were caulked or painted over). Then I like to use a putty knife worked between the wall and baseboards to start loosening them and prying them gently. Once I can get my mini pry bar in there, I can work them away from the wall more aggressively - careful to not damage the walls. Once they're loose, I yank 'em out by hand and trot them down to my bench for refurbishment.

You might want to consider painting the walls while you have your baseboards out and before your new flooring is installed. Easier job to do then, rather than later.

You don't have to do this, mind you. You still need to leave an expansion gap around the perimeter of your room, so how you do that is up to you. Removing and re-installing baseboards is easier than installing your flooring, IMO, so I find it silly to not do it.
 

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The site is causing some multiple postings today---that helps make up for the posts I made that vanished-----
 

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Personally I remove the base for a couple reasons unless you have tall base boards by the time you install the thickness of the floor then your shoe mould it makes the base look a little weird. But if you had a tall base you might get away with it.
 
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