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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
People,

Cutting some old wavy glass panes, and my 1st one snapped all messed up, no where near the score line, but jagged, and even beyond the score line a bit. What could it be? My tool is old, but hardly used it. Im willing to buy new, of course, and just wanted to get opinions as to where I might have gone wrong.

Am not gonna take any more chances on this 100 year old wavy glass.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Test the cutter on some new panes first, if it is making a smooth line you have it down.

Practice, practice, practice.

It is a skill that you need to develop, before wasting the "good stuff".

There is a certain pressure that you need to get any cutter to cut a perfect straight line .

A dull cutter, or too much pressure will leave a jagged line, and the glass breaks in a nasty edge.

Practice making as fine and straight line as you can get, it is not easy sometimes, but making a broad and deep line is not going to have good results when snapping.

And Snapping is not good either, you want a steady gentle pressure applied to the line, not a hard forceful pressure.

That little ball on the handle is there for a purpose, it applies the maximum pressure on a pinpoint on the line, and the split will follow the line.

Get plenty of practice on low cost scraps, before wasting the good stuff.



ED
 

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I worked next door to a sash and door outfit and after wrecking some glass I went over asked them to teach me. It is easy when they do it. After 7 or 8 trys the guy just took the cutter away from me and said there is no point. I haven't tried since. I think they put oil on the cutter.
 

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People,

Cutting some old wavy glass panes, and my 1st one snapped all messed up, no where near the score line, but jagged, and even beyond the score line a bit. What could it be? My tool is old, but hardly used it. Im willing to buy new, of course, and just wanted to get opinions as to where I might have gone wrong.

Am not gonna take any more chances on this 100 year old wavy glass.
I've never cut wavy glass but as a kid attempting to support a 48 ford coupe i cut a hellofah bunch of flat, framing pictures in a paint store. The first step in equipment is a piece of carpet on the work bench. Coal oil was a common aid but we never used it. I wouldn't take a chance with your 100 year old glass either but take to a glass shop for expert consultation.
 

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The wavy glass is hard to cut. You need a clean swipe, then hang the
cut part over the table and snap it. If you get the cutter as I pictured (below)
you’ll have better luck. We don’t fill the gun anymore, we just use WD-40
on top of the glass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow, I didnt know! Thanks, people! Right- dont try to learn on the good glass. Impossible to replace, I hear. Anyway, I think I do have a dull cutter. Will get a new one and try some cheap glass. Thanks again.
 

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I always coat the wheel with 3 in 1 oil (in the red container , it's thinner than the blue bottle ). It keeps the cutter cool & is especially helpful to amatuer

If you have good hearing , you can test the cutter by running across a piece of glass (not hard enough to score it , just to make the wheel turn) & listen for skips . G cutters usually get dropped (& the wheel damaged) before the wheel actually wears out .

HOWEVER , chances are the problem lies with the glass . I could find a link , but even modern float glass gets brittle as it ages . That ancient poured glass can be notoriously brittle .
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I always coat the wheel with 3 in 1 oil (in the red container , it's thinner than the blue bottle ). It keeps the cutter cool & is especially helpful to amatuer

If you have good hearing , you can test the cutter by running across a piece of glass (not hard enough to score it , just to make the wheel turn) & listen for skips . G cutters usually get dropped (& the wheel damaged) before the wheel actually wears out .

HOWEVER , chances are the problem lies with the glass . I could find a link , but even modern float glass gets brittle as it ages . That ancient poured glass can be notoriously brittle .
Another thing I didnt know. Gees, who would have known that glass gets "old". I mean, it's sand, and should be inert, but somehow it gets brittle. Maybe Im trying to do the impossible. Anyway, key thing is one has to score just ONE time, not go over it again.

Again, 1/16" glass- kind of thin to cut, usually one cuts 1/8" panes.....
 
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