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I have 2 tips that are hard to believe but I have used and have seen others able to do them as well.

Trying to find a water line or underground stream or even gas line out in a yard/field. Take an old Metal clothes hanger and cut in half then straighten out each end and form an L shape. Hold one in each hand fairly loosely but not dropping and point out at about a 45 degree angle in front you both ways. Walk towards the possible area and you should feel them slightly pulling into each other. When you reach the point the 2 cross it should be almost dead on to where the line is. Still remember to always dig safely and have your utilities located :thumbsup:

Need to find approximate center on a long wall or pipe (20+ feet). While standing back, point to each end and close your eyes and relax. Move your hands in to each other and when they touch open your eyes and you should be pointing to almost center, even if your standing off to one side.

We spent about half a day once just trying these out with a crew of about 8, we were within a few inches of center almost everytime. Was very handy when rigging 40' sticks of pipe lol
 

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Dorf dude...
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If you have a problem with the water evaporating from the trap in a seldom-used drain, causing the room to smell bad, pour some water in the drain and add a few drops of mineral oil (baby oil). The oil will spread out and create a film over the water. The water won't evaporate as quickly.
I use vegetable oil or anti-freeze. I fill the trap completely. Works great. dorf dude...
 

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Learning by Doing
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Sorry if this is a duplicate. I can't count the number of times I've tried to guide a screw through something into unseen threads ..... Often over my head, stretching and balancing at the same time :p

I cut two pieces of plastic off the blister pack. Punched a hole smaller than the screw. Put the screw through ( an outlet concealer in this pic) and snapped the plastic on each screw. It held the screw in place so I didn't have to try and hold the cover, screw, and screw driver.
 

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread but the tip I have seems to fit here the best!!

Old interior doors......we've all probably replaced them....such fun!!

Currently I'm doing a complete renovation (I'll get something up in Project Showcase soon, I promise) mixed with moving out of my old house AND livid in the "new" one!!

We all know storage/renovations/budget woes are tops on the list!!

Reusing interior doors for shelving is fast and free.....two words we all love!!





Closet door and s butcher block slab....quick work bench!





Interior door (complete with hinges and side jamb!). I screw thru hinge into stud if possible and a few spots thru stop molding also. You can barely see that I used the head jamb to support the corner.





Same as above with a brace on one end and some electrical wire (orange is the best!!) supporting the other end.


As you can see it's not hard, barely costs a nickel and it's instant gratification!!
 

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Great stuff foam is expensive and despite always looking for things to foam after I finish using it for its initial task, I always ended up wasting almost entire cans of the stuff most of the time because the plastic straw becomes useless once used. Rather than buy their expensive gun and solvent, I use 14-2 romex sheath to replace the straws once used. Once done using the foam, just leave the romex sheath on the can. The next time you need it, just bend, twist, and pull the sheath off and replace. I've had luck doing this up to about 2 months after first using the can.

Great stuff foam is also useful for patching smaller holes in drywall. 2" is about the max size hole for this. Just foam in the hole, building it up around the edges and onto itself until the hole is filled. Once dried, cut it flush to the wall and brush off any fuzzies and you're ready for a skim coat of drywall mud.

If you're trying to nail into a corner or some other awkward place where you either can't or don't want to use your fingers to hold the nail while hammering, Push the nail through some thin cardboard and use that to hold the nail. It'll keep your fingers out of the way and when you're done, just pull the cardboard off the nail and hammer it home.

When taping off something for painting, paint over the edges of the tape after placed with the color that's underneath the tape and let dry. This seals the edges of the tape for the next color and what bleeds underneath matches the color that's there already.
 

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For those of you that are determined to check for moisture coming through the concrete floor by taping the square foot of plastic down, try this if your original test does not produce any visible moisture.

Put down a layer of dry ice about 4ft. x 4 ft. and cover with insulation for a several hours. Remove the ice and then tape your sq. ft. of plastic down approximately centered on that larger area. If the area is wet don't tape.

If the area stays wet for awhile but eventually dries as the area warms the question has been answered so don't bother with the plastic. Test over.
 

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For those that would like to learn to use an eye splice, I've found this animated vid to be better instruction than human instruction.

Anyone that was in school in the 40s and 50s can recall this voice of the commentator. :thumbsup: Even we old folks that's lost a large percent of our hearing can understand what he says.

http://www.animatedknots.com/splice...ge=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com
That is a pretty neat knot. I give up though, who was it, I thought is was Gene Autry at first but this fellow has an English accent.
 
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