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the Musigician
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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
I really like the firewood carrier DM. Very creative, and probably as good or better than you could buy at the store! :thumbsup:
tnkx kc... i've never seen anything at stores for carrying logs. but never much looked either.
and yeah, i'm not dense... i kinda figured out the whole disappearing test tube thing right off, but just didn't understand what it had to do with anything, and why it got said. but hey, i've said some silly things here too, so no biggie.

how about some good drywalling tips? like the do one side of a corner, then the other side the next day tip? or how about some tape/mud tricks? lots of people here have problems with lifting/bubbling tape. (ok, so _I_ do)

DM
 

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the Musigician
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10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
a few more:
1: when wiring up in my attic, i'm running furring 12" above the height of the blown insulation.
2: the sharpie around my neck string lables EVERY wire into and out of every switch/junction/outlet box. line in/load out, switch1/switch2, etc. makes my job lots easier!
3: i got all 22" outlet boxes to make stuffing excess wires easier.
4: any other wiring tips from you electric pros?

DM
 

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Learning by Doing
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3,156 Posts
I too, am a ceramic magnet fan - I glue them on the bottoms of dust pans.

I use my Brother label maker to label all my wires at every possible location - where it leaves a box, where it enters a wall/ceiling, where it exits the wall/ceiling, where it enters a box, and what each wire does once it gets in the box.

I use my sharpie for leaving myself notes. My right work glove says 'THINK' and my left glove says 'DON'T BE STUPID'. My electrical pliers say 'TEST BEFORE YOU CUT'. My hammer says 'Don't pry on good wood'.

When using a rotary tool to cut out a opening in the ceiling you can make a quick and easy dust shield with a piece of disposable storage ware - I think mine's a 2 quart. And I've even seen them tricked out with portals for shop vacs.

I use the little half aprons waitstaff use at chain restaurants (heck mine evens says, Applebys). Here's the trick:wink::wink: I wear it backwards over my hind-parts - the stuff I keep in it is just as accessible and it doesn't ever get in my way when I'm working.

I use zip ties to put hangers on anything that will stand still. I make them big enough to hang over a door knob - inside most doors in my house you can find a utility knife, tape measure, flash light, dust pan, you name it - I hang it.

But without a doubt my favorite DIY 'trick' that I have learned is to use screws with a star drive - what I spend on fancy screws I make up with never ever stripping a screw and not having to junk phillips bits after every 10th screw. Sure I may be screwing (get it?:thumbup:it was worth reading all my ranting, wasn't it?) the next person who owns the house. But the efficiency outweighs my fear of Karma.
 

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Learning by Doing
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Ok, you should love this one. :yes:

I write on my work pants too. Notes, measurements, or lists go on the front left thigh, as needed. For some reason I like circling and labeling especially interesting or noteworthy stains - some favorites: ceiling fan oil and spray foam insulation.

But most important, I write on the waist band and the cuffs 'WP' and all along the back of one of the legs I write WORK PANTS. Why do I do this? Because I can easily identify those pants I shouldn't wear out in public. No matter how hard you try, you cannot explain to someone at the grocery store why you have an upside down list of electrical parts written on your leg.:whistling2:
 

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the Musigician
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10,404 Posts
Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Sure I may be screwing the next person who owns the house.
nah, they'll just go buy the bit and have fun.
good tips and funny too!, nice job Leah!

to pass position of outlets on drywall easily, i just smear any number of products on the cover and set the piece in place, remove it and there's where it goes! in a pinch, *blushing* i've used petroleum jelly, lipstick, elmers glue, and yes, i've even used spit......

to patch a big hole in drywall once at the bottom of the stairs in a home remodel/repair i took on. (sloppy furniture moving) i took 2x4s and made them longer than the hole by about 6 inches. then i screwed them place to give me a firm screwing for the cut patch. strong and unseen when i was done.

DM
 

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Stuck in the 70's
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2,221 Posts
I used to have a firewood carrier like Dangermouse, but it got lost in one of our moves. It really worked well.

But that was years ago and I'm older and lazier. Now I have a different solution to bring wood in from the garage. Every piece of luggage made now has wheels so you can find these for next to nothing at yard sales or thrift stores. Just find a heavy duty one and keep the handle down low.

Edited to add: Speaking of labeling wiring: I label any removable power cords, USB cords, phone chargers, etc. That way years from now, when I find them floating around I know if I should keep them or not.
 

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Old School
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Working on a ladder or in a confined space driving small nails or driving small screws and have a hard time getting to the box of them, or into your toolbelt, or even into your shirt pocket?

Simply drop a magnet into your shirt pocket, and touch a small handful of those pesky fasteners to the outside of your pocket. The magnet will hold them right there, out in the open, for you to easily and comfortably reach no matter what contorted position you may get into.
 

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Old School
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Need to find the center of a wide opening or a long piece of wood? Well, if you are as bad at math as I am, it's a risk to depend upon your dubious skills.

Since your eye can judge the approximate center... pull a measurement from one side to somewhere close to the center. Make a mark on an even inch reading.

Now turn the tape around and do the same thing from the other side... mark very same inch reading you used for the other side.

You now see, right in front of you, two marks. Simply divide that easy, short distance in half.

No, it makes no difference if your original marks both fell short of the true center... or if they both went a little past it. Divide the distance between them by 2, and you'll have the center.
 

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Old School
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You probably already know that flattening (dulling) the point of a finishing nail with your hammer will help to keep it from splitting the wood it's going into.

But did you know that if you do that flattening with the head of the nail resting where you will soon be nailing the flattened point, you increase the chances of your wood surviving the nail job?

This is because you pre-crush the wood fibers in that local area, and you also create a small recess that the head of the nail will nestle right down into as you set it.
 

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Old School
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If you paint directly out of a gallon bucket of paint, (or even pour from it), you know the aggravation of the way the rim fills up with paint that you just can't seem to get out.

Simply go around that recessed rim and punch a series of holes all around it with a large nail when you first open it (before you pour any paint). Later, the excess paint you manage to get in the rim will drain back down into the bucket through those holes. And when you put the lid back on, you still have just as good a seal as when you first opened it. This is because the lid seals around the edges of that rim, not down in the bottom of the groove.
 

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Old School
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Carry a needle with you. When you smash your finger (and we all do it), bite the bullet, and lance the side of the blood blister with the needle. Most of the pain you usually feel for days from that sort of hammer abuse will never occur.

Sure, play a match over it first to get it sterile.

And while we are here with needles and matches.... That smashed fingernail can be saved. Just get the needle good and hot on the tip with the match and "spin" it into the darkest part of of the nail injury. Right on top, like a drill. Do it quick and there is almost no pain. You just penetrate the nail. And you will be rewarded with a very relieving tiny squirt of blood when you have gone far enough.

You may want to protect your fingers that will be holding the hot needle.
 

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Old School
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3,634 Posts
The head of a burnt match (let it cool) is the perfect tool to remove an irritating foreign object from a coworker's eye. Somehow (I don't pretend to know how) it acts like a magnet, and the speck of dust or whatever is drawn right to it as you touch the match head to it.
 

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Old School
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3,634 Posts
Hate the dust that falls from a small wall drilling job? And it always seems to fall right where it is the hardest to clean up.

Simply grab a square-sided waste paper basket, dampen a cloth, and drape the cloth over the edge of the basket.

Hold the basket with one hand, under the drill, cloth side against the wall.

While you are drilling with the other hand, very slowly begin sliding the basket down the wall. The cloth will start rolling over into the basket, and with it, all the drilling mess.

Result, a clean job with no clean up other than to perhaps wipe the wall a little.
 

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Old School
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3,634 Posts
Save the tip you cut off a caulking tube. It is a good plug to turn around and seal up the end of the same tube.
 

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Old School
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Want a nice, shiny edge to a concrete pour? Wrap the form boards with Visqueene, stapling it tight on the outside. Your concrete pour will come out looking like glass.
 

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Learning by Doing
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3,156 Posts
The head of a burnt match (let it cool) is the perfect tool to remove an irritating foreign object from a coworker's eye. Somehow (I don't pretend to know how) it acts like a magnet, and the speck of dust or whatever is drawn right to it as you touch the match head to it.
It's the capillary action of the carbon - any dry fibrous object will do the same: q-tips, kleenex, handkerchief. It works by pulling the liquid off the eye and drawing the foreign object with it.
 

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Old School
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Very little ruins a saw blade as quickly as being over heated. But we all sometimes tend to make that saw blade groan from unintentional abuse. Binding the cut is a typical one. Try never to let the song of the blade become deep with strain. But if you do... let the saw keep running free for eight to ten seconds while you just hang it at your side.

This will do three good things.

One, it will give your motor a chance to cool down due to the air being pulled through the housing.
Two, it will likewise cool off the blade so it may hold its metal temper longer.
And three, it will bring a blade that might have begun to warp from the heat back into a true, flat plane again.
 
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