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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This isn't about window installation. More about fabricating. So I put it here in general.

Windows that don't have awnings on the outside can let a lot of rain in. This guy makes the only product I've seen for interior awnings. Seems like a nice product, but I'm trying to think of a quick-to-make DIY cheap version that will likely be uglier but that's ok. Trying to avoid just putting a piece of plastic in the window held in by duct tape, though.

The main problem is figuring out how to have the sides of something hook into the window sliding area. A bungee cord would work in theory, but that's overly flexible, and would still need a "trough" of some kind made.

I'm mainly trying to think of a one-piece flexible but firm product that the edges could be bent to latch/hook it in there. Something like vinyl flooring comes to mind, though the ends would have to be reinforced where it would latch/hook into the window sides.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do you need yours to be adjustable like his, or will you custom-build for each of your specific windows? All you need is for it to be flexible enough to squeeze in there.
Custom for each one.

Yeah, just squeeze something in there, and preferably get it to stay without duct tape. The question is what to use though. It has to be firm enough to maintain its form, yet flexible enough to be (probably) one piece. And just sticking a flat panel of some kind in there doesn't work unless something is added to the sides of it.

It could just be made out of thin wood, then cut side pieces and screw it all together. Then put a material on the wood to make it waterproof. But a one-piece, firm but bendable product would be easier.

And if the project gets too pricey or time-consuming, may as well just have bought it from the guy in the video. Though his website says they're out of stock.

Part of the reason for this thread is simply being surprised that I've never seen any discussion anywhere of this kind of problem and product before. I would have thought rain getting in is a problem for lots of people and there'd be many solutions of various kinds.
 

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I have never seen any window that allows water to come in. I mean, a window that is not due for a rebuild or replacement. Why would anyone want to have an awning on the inside of the room? That is just stupid to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have never seen any window that allows water to come in. I mean, a window that is not due for a rebuild or replacement. Why would anyone want to have an awning on the inside of the room? That is just stupid to me.
If a window doesn't have an awning on the outside, and you open the window to let air in, wind can send rain inside through the window screen.
 

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Fresh air is still allowed in but keeps rain out. That's a bunch of B S if the wind ever blows. I suspect double hung windows were developed to do just that, fresh air in at the top where the eaves protect the window from adverse weather, at least double hung works at my house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Plexiglas is easy to bend and form with a little heat. Kydex, from Tandy, is easy and fun to work with. But it's opaque.
I didn't know plexiglass can be formed so easily. Looked up some how-to's, yep, it can. Interesting.
Fresh air is still allowed in but keeps rain out. That's a bunch of B S if the wind ever blows. I suspect double hung windows were developed to do just that, fresh air in at the top where the eaves protect the window from adverse weather, at least double hung works at my house.
My roof (and rain gutter) overhangs a foot maybe two over the side of the house, but that overhang is a foot or higher than the top of the double-hung windows. So it doesn't help the top much with rain on windy days.

And a roof overhang doesn't help first-floor windows at all, so those need their own solution.

The product in the video should definitely work. I threw together a similar concept but much uglier version of it last summer to test out. I could leave the window open big even during huge, windy storms. Which is nice when huge, windy storms come in the middle of the night when asleep.

I wouldn't leave my home with the windows open period, and I live in a really nice neighborhood.
Most people probably don't even lock their doors around here. Could probably put a $100 bill in their front yard and if someone going by saw it they'd bring it to the front door and ask if they lost it, simply because it's the right thing to do.
 

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I didn't know plexiglass can be formed so easily. Looked up some how-to's, yep, it can. Interesting.

My roof (and rain gutter) overhangs a foot maybe two over the side of the house, but that overhang is a foot or higher than the top of the double-hung windows. So it doesn't help the top much with rain on windy days.

And a roof overhang doesn't help first-floor windows at all, so those need their own solution.

The product in the video should definitely work. I threw together a similar concept but much uglier version of it last summer to test out. I could leave the window open big even during huge, windy storms. Which is nice when huge, windy storms come in the middle of the night when asleep.


Most people probably don't even lock their doors around here. Could probably put a $100 bill in their front yard and if someone going by saw it they'd bring it to the front door and ask if they lost it, simply because it's the right thing to do.
And those are the neighborhoods where nobody can believe that their neighbor just got ...................
 

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I would think the only people that would be looking for these things are the people that have found a need. I do remember curtains being sucked out the bottom of the window and getting soaked. One of those may have helped.
 

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This is a year after the fact, but I stumbled upon this thread when looking to make one myself. I live on the 5th floor of a prewar building in New York. I get the heat rising from all the lower apartments and two South facing windows that get a lot of sun. In the winter, it's SO hot. Keeping the window open is the best solution in the winter because the window air conditioner can freeze with the precipitation and cold weather. I don't have any nice awnings that others might have, and no one's scaling the bricks to steal anything or murder me.

I don't know if you figured out your solution yet or shelled out the money. However, I devised one using a cardboard box by cutting it to fit the window and get the angle needed. I didn't use anything to hook into the window because I found that closing the window and 2 planter pots did the trick of wedging it nicely. After finding the shape, I wrapped it in Christmas wrapping paper to hide the fact that it's an Amazon box and used a double layer of packing tape to waterproof it. It's not the prettiest, but I only wanted it at night to sleep with. So, I don't mind. Hope this helps you, or whoever else might find this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I didn't use anything to hook into the window because I found that closing the window and 2 planter pots did the trick of wedging it nicely.
Until this thread, I had tunnel vision from seeing how the guy who sells them did it. Well, other than my previous works-but-is-super-ugly quick attempt.

Around the time of wanting the main problem window open a lot again last summer, I noticed some strong enough yet flexible metal I already had tucked away in a corner. Prior to that, I had been trying to think of a similar plastic material but couldn't find anything quite right.

This metal can be cut easily enough, and bends easily enough, yet is strong enough. I cut a couple slots on top for the window to slide down onto and hold it there, and I bent the sides of the metal into a tab/hook position to hook into the sides of the window. It can hold 50+ mph winds. Covered it in a layer of plastic. Works well, and cost nothing other than the random materials already sitting around.

It's still on the ugly side mainly due to rushing how I wrapped and attached the plastic to it, and the plastic could be changed to a nicer, more rigid plastic, (or use metal like this that is solid), but the main thing was figuring out the metal part and how to attach it to the window. Can't take a picture of it at the moment, but this is the type of decorative metal:

Grille Rectangle Mesh Automotive tire Automotive exterior
 
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