DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

diy ethernet

915 Views 30 Replies 12 Participants Last post by  skyking1
All I want to do is use ethernet cable for bit faster connection from router to computer. Total distance is about 100' with few walls in between and I am using usb wifi adapter but it is lagging a bit. I'm not sure about the in between helpers because set up seems to be less than plug and play.
1. Just router to computer to stream movies to see on tv. CAT 5e good enough? HDMI from computer to tv.
2. I have old ethernet plug crimper. I stopped after first few tries because they didn't work for me. I see that there are pass through plugs. I can see they make it easier to make my own. My failed tries, do you think my old crimper was faulty, that cheap crimper wasn't crimping well? I tried to be excellent with the wires but it failed. I bought factory made since then.
21 - 31 of 31 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
8,925 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Done and working, female jacks and male patch cords to router and computer. Again thanks to all for ideas. Female jack and one for practice and second fail because I used the punch tool on my knee. Wobble and the last wire wasn't pushed thru. Leviton also makes the jacks and wonder if it is better. Mine has plastic cap and it doesn't lock. Plan to electric tape wrap it after some time use and no connection problems. Wish now I saved all those ethernet patch cords that came with cable companies. I used cat5e cable and the jacks. About 100' extension and no need for heavier wires.
Also just learned that there is male connector called modular. This comes with wire organizer and stop end connector which sounds promising but no need for me.
All this was so my father can use livingroom tv for shows and the router was far away with 3 walls in between. Websites seem more stable and quicker response. I was using tp link usb wifi, but I thought it wasn't comparable to wire. Rejected wifi extender for confusing set up and I probably won't remember how if future problem.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
This cheap tester will let you know if you got them punched down OK. It is not the $8000 certification tester I used to certify 10 Gig speeds on Cat6a runs, but it lets you know when you crossed up a pair or missed a punchdown.
https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Tester...cphy=9033433&hvtargid=pla-1232748163405&psc=1

Glad you got it sorted. If you get a good connection with cable it just removes that wireless layer of uncertainty.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,554 Posts
I would not bother with hard wire. What ever you put in now is going to be obsolete quickly . Standard for Ethernet is now 1 gbit/sec and that requires Cat 6 cable and as speeds increase the quality of the termination points becomes even more critical . Instead Look at a two or more station mesh network. NetGear Orbi, Amazon eeros are examples. I put a two station Orbi and I have strong wireless through the house and indeed in my hammock 75 out in my backyard . Years ago I wired some rooms in my house with Cat 5e Ethernet (borrowed professional termination equipment from a friend who did work cabling professionally) it served we well but with the advances in WiFi I have abandoned it
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,925 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Appreciate the thoughts. My elderly father will not ever need gigabit connection. With ethernet wire, speed test says only 100mps download. I was surprised that's all he gets for the cable company monthly charges. But I don't know if this also depends on the 16 years old computer I'm using. Core2duo intel processor. Wonder if internet connection can be added? I know wifi cards can be changed. Graphics cards, etc. But add faster ethernet? As usual, talking about these things in the forum helps me get ideas.:) Will do the search.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I would not bother with hard wire. What ever you put in now is going to be obsolete quickly . Standard for Ethernet is now 1 gbit/sec and that requires Cat 6 cable and as speeds increase the quality of the termination points becomes even more critical . Instead Look at a two or more station mesh network. NetGear Orbi, Amazon eeros are examples. I put a two station Orbi and I have strong wireless through the house and indeed in my hammock 75 out in my backyard . Years ago I wired some rooms in my house with Cat 5e Ethernet (borrowed professional termination equipment from a friend who did work cabling professionally) it served we well but with the advances in WiFi I have abandoned it
Cat5e does 1 Gb for the full length of 100 meters, and 10 Gb for 45 meters.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,252 Posts
I don't know why so many people are negative about crimping.....unless they just can't do it well.
Crimping is much faster than punchdown blocks, requires one tool and is done quickly.
The pass through ends are easy and fast and produce excellent results.
All you have to do is pay attention to the colors.
Now I can. understand some tech preferring to do it another way......especially if they get paid by the hour.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,120 Posts
I would not bother with hard wire. What ever you put in now is going to be obsolete quickly . Standard for Ethernet is now 1 gbit/sec and that requires Cat 6 cable and as speeds increase the quality of the termination points becomes even more critical . Instead Look at a two or more station mesh network. NetGear Orbi, Amazon eeros are examples. I put a two station Orbi and I have strong wireless through the house and indeed in my hammock 75 out in my backyard . Years ago I wired some rooms in my house with Cat 5e Ethernet (borrowed professional termination equipment from a friend who did work cabling professionally) it served we well but with the advances in WiFi I have abandoned it
This is indeed far easier than running ethernet cable. Orbi and Eero are "mesh routers"; they talk to each other on their own wifi channel. So you put 2 or 3 in your house and they will cover the entire house as if it's just one router. The important thing is that this allows you to use the newer "5 GHz" wifi band rather than the older and slower 2 GHz. 5 GHz is way faster, but the drawback is that the signal degrades a lot when it goes through walls. So if you have a few mesh routers throughout your house, the 5 Ghz signal will be strong everywhere and your network will be very fast. You won't be able to notice the difference between wired except under extreme conditions. (This assumes your laptop and other device is compatible with 5 Ghz; all new laptops, phones and tablets are, but a few years back they were mostly 2 Ghz only.)

All of that said... I ran ethernet cable from a central point (where the router is) to several rooms and hooked the mesh routers up that way. The OP could consider doing that as well for the "best of both worlds": wired connections where he wants them, AND fast wifi throughout the house.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Wired just works^
Once it is in and tested there are no questions if the radios are still good or passwords to hand out. I do what you laid out above, hard wire AP's out where they need them. I did mesh systems 15 years ago and do long haul wireless where I need it, but where I can cut the corner with a piece of wire, I do it.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top