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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All I want to do is use ethernet cable for bit faster connection from router to computer. Total distance is about 100' with few walls in between and I am using usb wifi adapter but it is lagging a bit. I'm not sure about the in between helpers because set up seems to be less than plug and play.
1. Just router to computer to stream movies to see on tv. CAT 5e good enough? HDMI from computer to tv.
2. I have old ethernet plug crimper. I stopped after first few tries because they didn't work for me. I see that there are pass through plugs. I can see they make it easier to make my own. My failed tries, do you think my old crimper was faulty, that cheap crimper wasn't crimping well? I tried to be excellent with the wires but it failed. I bought factory made since then.
 

· Naildriver
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Any way to move the router closer to the computer? I did that once with the router in my basement office. Quickly determined that was a Duh moment. Moved the router to where all the periphery was and never looked back. Office stuff still works fine. I'm just wondering about the 100' run. I know protocol says it will be fine, but I question it a lot. If your crimpers aren't hitting smoothly, you may need a new set. I get frustrated with ethernet ends. But that is because I am impatient.
 

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Go with the pass through plugs.
I just installed a whole house audio system and the controllers used cat 5 cabling.
The pass thru plugs make it 10X easier to wire.
But you may need a different crimper since the one I bought cuts the excess wire as it crimps.
I "suppose" you could trim them off another way.......just sayin'.
 

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If I ever make any more cable I will buy the pass thru crimper. I have a very hard time fanning the wires.

What failed? Do you have a cable tester? https://www.amazon.com/AOWIZ-Network-Cable-Tester-Ethernet/dp/B09F68WGLK/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?crid=2VBZHF8L4EGBU&keywords=ethernet+cable+tester&qid=1671703780&sprefix=ethernet+cable+tester,aps,109&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzSEtBVzFDS0lKOFIyJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwODg1MzIwWVlRWjdPSERRSDZQJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTAxNTk5ODEyV0NPWjc1Njg1VlVTJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

Contrary to what you see online the color of the wires does not matter so long as both ends of the cable match. But the separation of the wires can matter at higher transfer rates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for replies. There is no good way, because of the house build, to centralize the router/modem. What I can do is relocate the modem/router to another room and use the ethernet from there.
I also found out that the crimper I bought, 10 years ago?, is Klein, but not pass through. I just bought some pass thru connectors and going to see if I can do a better job this time. I am going to test the connection by using it. The tester is convenient but I think only for the pro level work, making many? Past problem was that cable I made worked at first then stopped working. I verified by replacing with factory cable. All I can think of is the crimping didn't penetrate the wire insulation, or I'm color blind.:)
 

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We've had nothing but problems trying to get functioning ends on the ethernet cables we're running at our church. The guy I'm working with has a couple of fancy tools to do it, but keeps ending up with a wire, sometimes 2 or 3, that don't work. If it were me, I'd just buy a premade 100' cable.
 

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Thank you all for replies. There is no good way, because of the house build, to centralize the router/modem. What I can do is relocate the modem/router to another room and use the ethernet from there.
Depends on the modem you have. A lot of the modern ones have the ability to broadcast to a repeater to increase the wireless range and thruput. Eero is one brand. There are others. For a wired connection you can simply use cheap switches. You can run wire from the router to a switch and piggyback off of that. 100mbps is easily;y done this way.
 

· Red Seal Electrician
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I never crimp ends on cat5e. I terminate them in a female socket with a punch tool. Use patch cords from the wall to the device.

If you want to be lazy/cheap, get that 100' patch cord.

IME, most devices will sync to 1Gb/s speed with cat5e on all but the longest runs, and then auto adjust to whatever the line conditions can handle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thank you all. U2slow, changed my world.:) Never thought about the female socket! It never occured. Out of sight, out of mind, just dumb.


Found this. Seems comprehensive. The guy talks about A and B styles and that B is most common. Does that mean that any patch cord I buy, example 6' amazon basic, is likely to be B style?
Also, why is it that crimper, even klein, seems to be problematic? Is it that the connectors aren't all made to exact standards?
 

· Red Seal Electrician
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The guy talks about A and B styles and that B is most common. Does that mean that any patch cord I buy, example 6' amazon basic, is likely to be B style?
Also, why is it that crimper, even klein, seems to be problematic? Is it that the connectors aren't all made to exact standards?
A or B doesn't really matter. What matters is both ends of each cord or run being done the same. (i.e. not A on one end and B on the other)

I find rj45 cord ends finicky to DIY crimp, so I don't do it. Punchdowns are more reliable. Let a machine in a factory make patch cords.
 

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You could try a powerline ethernet adapter that modulates the data signal into your house wires. Plug one unit into a wall receptacle where it can be connected to the router by ethernet cable, and other units that can be plugged into receptacles near your devices. If you have more than one device in a certain area you could put a simple ethernet switch in between the powerline adapter and then feed the devices from that.

Amazon.com: TP-Link Powerline Ethernet Adapter Starter Kit - AV1000 Gigabit Port, Plug&Play, Ethernet Over Power, Nano Size, Ideal for Smart TV, Online Gaming, Wired Connection Only (TL-PA7017 KIT) : Everything Else
 

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TP-Link makes good gear but this was just an example in case the OP had never heard of powerline networking. Buy whatever brand you want.

Just an FYI. TP-Link is a Chinese government-owned company. Nobody seems to know how much of your data they can and do monitor through their routers and such.
 

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Came in to say never crimp and terminate in female ends. @u2slow has covered all that nicely, thank you.
Terminate female as shown and always use premade patch cables for that last connection.
I have crimpers and they have a single purpose, terminating POE camera runs and POE Access Points (APs)
I have installed hundreds of drops of network cable and certified it with test equipment.
I will go copy and paste a write up I made a while back about it.
 

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First bit is about Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) vs Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) Bottom line is shielded is not your friend if it is not bonded properly. Regular UTP does fine.
Notes from Skyking

See my post above the why not. UTP does a fine job of eliminating interference, and STP if it is not properly bonded will bring everything in to the cable. It really sucks that way.
CAT6 is good for 10Gig for 60 meters. That means ANY CAT6 cable. CAT6a is better.

Quote:
What is the difference between horizontal and vertical wire? Maybe get some mounting hardware then run the wire along the overhead rafters and avoid contact all together?
Riser cable is certified for running up several floors in a vertical chase. It is good for horizontal also.
No cable will carry 10gig if it is improperly installed. I can't tell you all the ins and outs in a post but here are a few pointers:

1) watch bend radius. keep bends gentle. See the specs for exact figures.
2) be careful of installation bends and 'assholes'. "*******" is the highly technical term describing what a wire does when it forms a loop that gets pulled tighter and tighter till it deforms the jacket. These loops feed right out of the box. The only way to avoid them entirely is to have help at the box while pulling in the cable.
3) Use reel-in-box cable if at all possible. it helps with item #2.
4) don't zip-tie or otherwise secure the cable tightly. Simply put, it can interfere with proper operation and cause reflection of the signals. if you must use ties be very very gentle.
5) think of laying the cable rather than pulling it. try not to put it in a huge bind while dragging it in, and support it at least every 4' . Use supports that don't put a harsh load on the wire. Caddy makes a cool retainer with a gentle broad support.
6) if you are making several runs, invest in a few boxes. Your time is worth more than the wire.
7) if dragging wire in through a conduit or long restricted space, be aware of the possibility of 'burning' a wire. 'burning' occurs when a wire that is already in place restricts the new wire being dragged in, and the new wire literally burns or cuts through the jacket and into the conductors of the original wire. It is a real bummer because you may never see the damage and have a hell of a time troubleshooting it when it fails certification.
To eliminate 'burning', measure up the runs going through that conduit and pre-cut them with plenty to spare, and drag the whole bundle in at once. See #6 for the ideal solution, enough boxes to drag them all in out of the box.
8)Leave plenty of slack in the jack end, at least 2'. leave at least 6' to spare at the patch panel. you can't just splice it and it will save your butt if you have to move the panel, misjudged routing, etc.
9) overbuild the cable plant. if you need 1 drop, bring 2. Something will change and you will be happy you did. Some of those places are a real ***** to get back to, even impossible after construction. Keep in mind #7 too. You can mess a whole lot of things up trying to drag in a wire you could have brought in in the beginning.


If you are going to spend all the money don't ruin it by crimping. Get a good punchdown tool with a 110 blade and a pair of klien electrician scissors. Home depot has them both.
Practice scoring the jacket until you are sure you are not cutting conductors below, and then bend/twist it off.
Terminate all runs in keystone jacks, mounted in faceplates or surface mount boxes. Anything else is not certified and asking for troubles.
Buy premade patch cables for a few bucks each to hook up.
Some people have the right spot for a patch panel, i did not. I ran 10 drops in my house and installed two 6 port plates in low voltage brackets, it is clean and flush to the wall.
 

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Not clear what you are saying. I am just a DIY and have done several ethernet runs for outdoor POE cams. I don't see any way except to crimp the connectors on the cam end. Else would have to drill overlarge holes and probably still have difficulty fishing a premade cable with a connector. But crimping ethernet connectors on is a real PITA for sure. I guess you could place a sealed keystone jack outside in a secure location near the cam and then use a short premade cable to terminate the connection.

Came in to say never crimp and terminate in female ends. @u2slow has covered all that nicely, thank you.
Terminate female as shown and always use premade patch cables for that last connection.
I have crimpers and they have a single purpose, terminating POE camera runs and POE Access Points (APs)
I have installed hundreds of drops of network cable and certified it with test equipment.
I will go copy and paste a write up I made a while back about it.
 

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Not clear what you are saying. I am just a DIY and have done several ethernet runs for outdoor POE cams. I don't see any way except to crimp the connectors on the cam end. Else would have to drill overlarge holes and probably still have difficulty fishing a premade cable with a connector. But crimping ethernet connectors on is a real PITA for sure. I guess you could place a sealed keystone jack outside in a secure location near the cam and then use a short premade cable to terminate the connection.
That is the only place that I do crimp, POE cams and AP's
Any other drop gets a keystone and patch cable.
It is right there in the middle of my post.
 
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