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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My water heater was relocated a few years ago to save space and the plumber didn't really divert any of the pipes. Instead, he just extended a few which resulted in a really long run from my heater to my kitchen sink. It takes a good while to get hot water. I've thought about diverting the hot water line over to the kitchen with a copper T but I'm starting to worry that it might diminish my water pressure. It's 3/4" copper coming out of the heater and it switches to 1/2" copper just before it diverts off the main line and goes to the fixtures as you can see in the drawing. Any recommendations?

 

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IMO I don't think you will have any problems the way your drawing shows the new line.. You could cut the old hot water line out at the washingmachine & use that material & you wouldn't have to buy new material.. If you didn't want to go through the trouble of re-routing a warwe line . You could install a circulating pump for the kitchen. You wouldn't have to wait on hot water
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks

Actually, I thought about the recirculating pump but I'd need electrical under there. My pressure at the kitchen end isn't quite as high as the pressure on the bathroom side so I was hoping to intensify the water pressure at the kitchen a little bit from making the run a little shorter. SHould I make the run all 1/2" or should I go 3/4" till just before the floor penetration?
 

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The size of the pipe won't give you anymore pressure. Larger pipe will provide you with more volune. I don't knoe how long of a run it is. You could run 3/4 to the 1 st. bend then go 1/2. Has it always been kinda low on the hot side ? You could have an obstruction in your faucet valve
 

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The hot water in my home has always had a slightly lower pressure than the cold. I think someone in this forum said that it's normal, due to the increased resistance in the HWH.
Of course, you won't see the pressure difference if you put a gauge on it, because without drawing any flow, there is no drop through the resistance, just as in electrical systems.

What if you connected both lines, so you have redundancy? I've never heard of it being done that way, but why not?
You would just need two shutoff valves to isolate a section of pipe.

FW
 
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