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Discussion Starter #1
I am fairly new to DIY home improvements. I have a deck that is located at the front of my house (live in a small beach town...homes are very close together, etc.). Currently the deck is enclosed with lattice, which is very cheap looking and you can obviously see right under the deck. I want to make a more sturdy/concealed enclosure with 1" x 6" wood panels. My problem is figuring out how to stabilize them from the deck to the ground, which is concrete. Do I just make a 45° angle cut on the bottom of each panel, place the non-angled part under the joist and then use a rubber mallet to hammer them into place? This may sound ridiculous to those who are experienced, but that is why I am here. Also, I am currently re-painting the deck. I have successfully removed 95% of the old paint from the floor...an have sanded it with 50 grain...am going to use fine sand paper to finish it off. Someone has suggested to me that I use Rubbol Solid Dek to paint. It requires two coats, etc. and is supposedly high quality. If anyone can help me in any way shape or form I would really appreciate it. Thank you in advance.
 

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How far from deck to concrete?
I'd get a pressure treated 2x4 and attach it to the concrete to hold the bottom of the 1x6's.
Hardware stores sell a $20 version of the tool that will shoot Hilti pins into concrete with 22 caliber blanks.
Put construction adhesive between the concrete and wood first.
Especially if you are hand nailing, let the glue set up (1 day) before you beat nails into it.
It only takes a few pins, one every 3' or so.

Or, if your deck support posts are fairly close together you can nail a board between them at the bottom and may not need to attach it with pins. Try a 2x6 if it's an 8' span. Glue it to the concrete and nail each end to the bottom of the deck posts.

What is the 45 degree cut for?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How far from deck to concrete?

I would estimate about 3 feet high and would enclose about 36 feet.

I'd get a pressure treated 2x4 and attach it to the concrete to hold the bottom of the 1x6's.

Hardware stores sell a $20 version of the tool that will shoot Hilti pins into concrete with 22 caliber blanks.

I looked up what Hilti pins are and am having trouble envisioning how to use the pins to attach 2x4s to the concrete. Do I need brackets to pin down that will hold the 2 x 4s in place?

Put construction adhesive between the concrete and wood first.
Especially if you are hand nailing, let the glue set up (1 day) before you beat nails into it.
It only takes a few pins, one every 3' or so.

Or, if your deck support posts are fairly close together you can nail a board between them at the bottom and may not need to attach it with pins. Try a 2x6 if it's an 8' span. Glue it to the concrete and nail each end to the bottom of the deck posts.

What is the 45 degree cut for?

I am having the sidewalk repaved with concrete and under the deck slightly. I have a feeling they will pitch the cement so that it flows away from under the deck and into the street. I thought it would be difficult to get a 2x6 that is flat on both ends to stand straight between the deck and concrete. I am going to take pictures so you have a visual...thanks for the response.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So you are saying if the posts are not close together then lay the 2x4s flat and pin them in? Then, put the 1x6's in between the 2x4 and the outerbeam or nail it to the outside of the outer beam? Will water be able to get out from under the deck if the 2x4s are laying flat?
 

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I'd leave some small areas open, with screen or lattice, for cross ventilation. Be safe, G
 

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Oh yeah, water flow, good point.
How about nail down 3'foot sections of 2x4 with 1' gaps between each (approx) then go across the top of these with another solid 2x4 nailed to the 3' pieces which are hilti'ed to the concrete.

Then leave you 1x6's 1/4" off the concrete so their ends will stay dry.
 

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Keep the wood off the ground at least 3 inches. Attach the 2x4's to the posts holding up the deck. Install the 1x6's as low as you want, but still keeping them off the ground at least an inch.
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ron

I see you are on LI...I am in Long Beach myself...you?

So after a lot of thought this is what I came up with. For some strange reason the support beams are 3.5" x 3.5" ...I was unable to find this cut on-line at Home Depot or lumber yards...go figure. Anyway, since I want the panels to be flush with the support beams I was thinking I could do the following...please bear with me and ask questions b/c I am not sure how easy this will be to understand. I am just going to give a simple example that covers one section.

So, the support beams in the picture are 51" apart. I am going to purchase a 4" x 4" pressure treated post that is a little over 4 feet long. I am then going to cut out a notch on each end of the new post...I will cut out 2" in depth and 3.5" in length from each side. Then, from behind the support beams I will attach the new post horizontally to each of them. The notch will allow for 1.5" of the 4" post to come forward. This will leave a 2" depth between the new horizontal post and the support beam. I am going to repeat this step for the bottom as well. Then I use 2" x 6" panels cut to the proper vertical height and screw them into the bottom and top horizontal posts that I just installed. This should make the panels flush with the support beams, correct? I am not sure if the picture I uploaded will help, but all of the lattice and stray wood aside from the actual support beams are coming out.
 

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All you need is 2- 2x4's. They span between the post and are set back the thickness of a 2x6. New PT will be 1 5/8" thick. It will dry out to about 1 1/2".
2x6 is sort of over kill for a simple fascade cover. You could put 3-2x4's between the posts and use 1x6 as the cover if you're worrying about twisting.

Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ron, I am a total beginner and do not understand really what you mean. How will attach the 2 x 4s to the support posts? Do you think the idea I came up with will work? I just want the 2x4s or 2x6s to be flush with the support posts, which will form a nice enclosure...do I make sense? When will the wood dry/contract? You mentioned a PT? shrinking an 1/8 of an inch? Sorry the questions if they seem dumb.
 

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Ron, I am a total beginner and do not understand really what you mean. How will attach the 2 x 4s to the support posts? Do you think the idea I came up with will work? I just want the 2x4s or 2x6s to be flush with the support posts, which will form a nice enclosure...do I make sense? When will the wood dry/contract? You mentioned a PT? shrinking an 1/8 of an inch? Sorry the questions if they seem dumb.
Exterior wood for decks is Pressure Treated, PT. It's filled with fluid that prevents rot and insect damage. It takes between 6 months and a year to dry out depending on how new the wood is.
You attach the 2x4's by tow nailling or "tow screwing" the wood to the post from the bottom or back. You need either hot dipped galvinized or stainless steel hardware to secure the wood. Regular hardware will corrode and fail due to the chemicals.
You can go the 4x4 route and do what you said. It's just a lot more work for the same outcome. Do what you're comfortable with.
Ron
 

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Originally you mentioned 1x6 panels, then lately 2x6. 1x6 makes more sense.
3.5 x 3.5 is the size of wood that is sold as a 4x4.
Don't use new 4x4's, buy 2x4's and "toe-screw" them 3/4" back from the front edge of your existing posts, one at the top and one near the bottom. They will work best if attached "flat", with the 1.5 inch surface facing out. 3/4" of them will protrude back behind your post but no one ever looks back there.
1x6 panels attached to these will be flush to the front of the posts.

If I'd know you had posts so close together I'd not have gone off on the Hilti idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You both mention toe screwing, but I have no clue how to do that or what it will accomplish. Can someone please explain that in a little more detail assuming I would toe screw the 2x4 from behind the existing support posts? The only reason I hatched the 4x4 plan was because I was worried about splitting the wood from screwing in all of the new panels...
 

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You both mention toe screwing, but I have no clue how to do that or what it will accomplish. Can someone please explain that in a little more detail assuming I would toe screw the 2x4 from behind the existing support posts? The only reason I hatched the 4x4 plan was because I was worried about splitting the wood from screwing in all of the new panels...
Do a google on toenailing. You should get some pictures.
If you're concerned about splitting the wood, you drill pilot holes to put the screws or nails into. If you're unsure what a pilot hole is, google it.
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Ron. I did Google it earlier, but I am not sure I will be able to execute that. From what I saw and from what I know of Pilot holes...this is what I get from it. I would be drilling a pilot hole through the 2x4 and the support post. Then, I would use a screw to attach the 2x4 to the support post by drilling it through the pilot hole?

I was at HD at 6am this morning and they did not have hot dipped galvanized screws...or even a bulk quantity of stainless steel.

So, I picked up Deck Mate w/ Evercote? 9x3.5" in size...It has all kinds of lifetime guarantees on the box against rust, etc. Have you ever heard of these?
 

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Sure, they're another alternative to stainless or galvanized.
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think I have a good idea of what to do. Now for the new lumber...couple of questions. Pressure treated was mentioned...does it matter what type...Pine, etc.? Also, I have decided to replace almost all of the spindles/balusters and cut new ones...can someone recommend a miter saw that will allow me to make the miter cuts and also just cut regular pieces of lumber?
 

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I think I have a good idea of what to do. Now for the new lumber...couple of questions. Pressure treated was mentioned...does it matter what type...Pine, etc.? Also, I have decided to replace almost all of the spindles/balusters and cut new ones...can someone recommend a miter saw that will allow me to make the miter cuts and also just cut regular pieces of lumber?
Pressure treated wood in Southern Yellow Pine.
If you're going to buy a miter saw, don't just buy on for the project you're working on now. Try to think ahead to things you might use it for in the future.
A simple 10" saw might be all you need, but if you plan to cut molding or cross cutting wood 6" or wider, you might want a bevel, sliding saw.
These saws come with either 8", 10" or 12" blades. Prices range from under $100. to $700.
It's doubtful you would need anything over 10" Maybe a simple 8" saw is all you need. For occassional use you could probably go with a Black and Decker or Ryobi saw.
Try looking on Toolseeker.com They have many options where you can pick out quite a few saws to see how they compare in both features and price.
Ron
 
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