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Discussion Starter #1
Deck staining project, I have this deck that hasn’t been cleaned or stain in six years. Some of the railing and boards may need to be replaces because of cracks and splinter (see attached pictures). I need to go ahead and stain the deck because I am trying to sell the house. I am going to attempt to find the Kiln-Dried wood to use on the deck so I don’t have to wait a year to stain it (if I replace). Couple questions I have: Should I replace the board or could I use a sander or something that would smooth it out without replacing? Would using the Kiln-Dried wood mean that I can go ahead and stain? Should I sand this new wood prior to staining? Should I stain the bottom prior to installing? I am using the Restore-A-Deck Cleaner and Brightener. Do I still need to use a stream cleaner?
 

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Anonymous Tard
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That is why you don't leave a deck unprotected. Those boards look pretty awful. While kiln dried wood can be immediately stained, you need to make sure you use the same species of wood or the stain finish won't match. I would sand the stew out of your deck and then see what you absolutely need to replace, put the new boards on, and then sand them as well.

You can use a solid stain product designed for weathered decks to cover the rest of the damage. That is about the best you can do without rebuilding it. At least that is how I see it. Hard to say without being able to see the whole deck and gauge the damage for myself. Maybe someone else can offer an alternative.
 

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It looks to me like pretty much every board has deep cracks all over the place. It's not really fixable. Put some lipstick on that pig. Just paint it. And plan on using twice as much paint as they recommend because a lot of paint will go into those cracks and get wasted.
 

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You can turn over boards, but not ones that have angle cuts on the end. I would repair with regular treated wood, but at the home center choose some that feel dry, (store-dried?) put it on and let it sit a few days, then stain it with solid stain.

When you look at stains, read the labels in the store. On some water-based stains it says it's better to apply when the wood is still slightly damp from cleaning because then it penetrates better.
 

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I would just do what you gotta do to pretty it up. A observant buyer and/or a good real estate agent will see through it anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think I am going to pretty it up. I mean none of the boards are rotten or anything just splinters. If they like the rest of the house and want me to replace the deck I will do it then.
 

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I think I am going to pretty it up. I mean none of the boards are rotten or anything just splinters. If they like the rest of the house and want me to replace the deck I will do it then.
If a potential buyer cites the condition of the deck as justification for their offer, it becomes a point of bargaining. I would lower my sign back rather than offer to build a new deck. It makes for a cleaner deal. Saying "I agree to build a new deck" can mean different things to different people" and I would imagine a good seller's agent and lawyer would recommend against it unless you are in an area where you have to sell your soul to sell a house.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am going to get a bid on replacing the boards. If not to bad I might do it. I can replace the railing myself but it could take me a week to replace the boards myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If a potential buyer cites the condition of the deck as justification for their offer, it becomes a point of bargaining. I would lower my sign back rather than offer to build a new deck. It makes for a cleaner deal. Saying "I agree to build a new deck" can mean different things to different people" and I would imagine a good seller's agent and lawyer would recommend against it unless you are in an area where you have to sell your soul to sell a house.
Wasn't going to offer and if it didn't come up I would not say anything about it. It is not unsafe or anything. Like you said if it became an issue I would bargain with them over it.
 

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I wouldn't replace all the boards, after doing all that work in the end a buyer may not like the style of the deck anyway, or not like the color you chose. Fix it up only to the point where it doesn't scare away buyers. Everyone that's not just off the boat knows that wooden decks need regular refinishing.

Make sure it has a good solid feel to it when you walk on it. Decking can be fixed, but if the entire frame feels wobbly that will turn off buyers.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I wouldn't replace all the boards, after doing all that work in the end a buyer may not like the style of the deck anyway, or not like the color you chose. Fix it up only to the point where it doesn't scare away buyers. Everyone that's not just off the boat knows that wooden decks need regular refinishing.

Make sure it has a good solid feel to it when you walk on it. Decking can be fixed, but if the entire frame feels wobbly that will turn off buyers.
I had a guy looking at it today and he was talking about replacing some boards and it would be a year and 1/2 before you could stain it. I asked him about just turning the boards over. He said that he might could do that on some of the bad ones. My son is 6'3" and 265lbs and he jumps up and down on it all the time, very little give. Some board needs to be screwed down.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What about turning the boards over? I checked and they look good under the bottom. Only thing is the angles at the end of the boards. I guess I could turn them all over.
 
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