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I had to rip out an elevated deck that bee hives infested in 2x2 hollow columns. The deck posts are 3 king studs going down to the concrete secured by the framing around the columns that are then wrapped in cultured stone (completely weather proof). The concrete slap is 16" thick. The span is 14' on a 14x12 deck. The building inspector is telling me I may need to prove their is a footer going below the frost line (30") The concrete slab is 18 years and has not moved. it is 16' x 16' and at least 16" thick. It would seem to be a 16" concrete slab would be enough to carry the loads of a small deck. Thoughts?


I am a DIYer that has tackled many home improvement projects just not a pro
 

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Naildriver
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We don't know where you are located because your profile is incomplete. That helps us to determine certain criteria for answers. If 30" is the frost line where you live, then you will have to core out the existing pad and pour a footer 30" deep at least 12" in diameter, to suit the inspector.

Oh, and it's not for support as much as it is for frost heave.
 

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Got some pictures?
Why was a deck built over a slab?
A slab 16" thick, hmm.
 

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Plus one on location. Sometimes you can get away with a freestanding deck without full depth footings.

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Discussion Starter #6
this deck is in the Denver area. Concrete patio is exit from a walkout basement. it is a minimum o 16" thick. ;might be 20+. the patio was poured in 2002 when the house was built and has not moved. the deck was orginally built with KDHF joist and decking. The inspector did not allow changing the 14' span from KDHF to SYP #1 treated. the columns conversation came out of left field. I get the heave part of the footings but the patio has not moved in 17 years. seems it wouldn't move going forward
 

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If the deck was built after 2002 it seems like the building department would have a record of inspections done on the original footings.

R403.1.4.1 is the code section that speaks to deck footings in the IRC. Check it out and go from there.

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I'm assuming that you were not there when the house was built. That slab quite possibly isn't 16" thick, I actually would be quite surprised if it was. Most likely it's 4"+/- with a turned down in edge around the perimeter that makes it look thicker. The center is probably just a mound of gravel or other type of fill. I don't any contractor that would pour a slab that thick, it's way too expensive to do it that way.
 

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Guapo
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That slab quite possibly isn't 16" thick, I actually would be quite surprised if it was. Most likely it's 4"+/- with a turned down in edge around the perimeter that makes it look thicker. The center is probably just a mound of gravel or other type of fill.
I agree with that. I doubt that the slab is 16" thick. Interstate highways only have to be 9" thick. Why would anyone pour a 16" slab? As I said in post #2, the inspector is right about the footings.
 

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If the deck was built after 2002 it seems like the building department would have a record of inspections done on the original footings. lk
This is the easiest path. Ask the building department to pull up the plans. It will show if there are existing footings and if it all passed inspection. This assumes the deck wasn’t built without a permit.
 
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