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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building an extension onto my existing deck that will come out to a 24' diamteter above ground pool.

The existing deck is 12x12 and attached to the house.

I want the extension to be freestanding - but at the same time - attached to the existing deck to create a seamless transition (it should "feel" like it's all one deck, maybe with a slight 4" - 6" step down to second level)

Attached are photos of the existing deck and the area where the extension will go, along with a quick sketch of what this will look like with some rough measurements.

I have a good bit of carpentry experience (e.g., have built privacy fences, tables, shelves, etc.) and have all the necessary tools to DIY this.

That said, as I am starting to plan this out, it does seem a little bit trickier than just building a standard ground-level deck. I want to make sure I am using best practices and following a sound set of plans that provides a solid structure and meets 2012 international building codes.

I am in the Nashville, TN area. Where/how would be the best way to get a rough design/plan and material list to follow that would get me started on DIY'ing this project?

Photos to come in next post on this thread
 

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I am building an extension onto my existing deck that will come out to a 24' diamteter above ground pool.

The existing deck is 12x12 and attached to the house.

I want the extension to be freestanding - but at the same time - attached to the existing deck to create a seamless transition (it should "feel" like it's all one deck, maybe with a slight 4" - 6" step down to second level)

Attached are photos of the existing deck and the area where the extension will go, along with a quick sketch of what this will look like with some rough measurements.

I have a good bit of carpentry experience (e.g., have built privacy fences, tables, shelves, etc.) and have all the necessary tools to DIY this.

That said, as I am starting to plan this out, it does seem a little bit trickier than just building a standard ground-level deck. I want to make sure I am using best practices and following a sound set of plans that provides a solid structure and meets 2012 international building codes.

I am in the Nashville, TN area. Where/how would be the best way to get a rough design/plan and material list to follow that would get me started on DIY'ing this project?

Photos to come in next post on this thread
The posts under your deck are they set in the ground on on top of concrete piers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They are 6x6 in the ground from the looks of it. I haven't dug down to make sure but I believe they just dug a hole, poured a solid concrete footing in, and then put them on that and backfilled the top 2' of hole with dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They are 6x6 in the ground from the looks of it. I haven't dug down to make sure but I believe they just dug a hole, poured a solid concrete footing in, and then put them on that and backfilled the top 2' of hole with dirt
 

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They are 6x6 in the ground from the looks of it. I haven't dug down to make sure but I believe they just dug a hole, poured a solid concrete footing in, and then put them on that and backfilled the top 2' of hole with dirt
So i would be something like this for your piers and beams with the joists going right up to he pool
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks so much!

Just to make sure I'm clear, you'd recommend a freestanding cantilever design with the posts and beams laid out as you described, and then the joists and rim joists cantilevered over right up to the pool deck as shown below in red?

The decking will sit about 4" or so lower than the existing deck so I'm going to have to think about how to connect the new deck to the existing deck in the best way. The new rim joist could be bolted to the existing deck's rim joist but I'm wondering if there's a better way?
 

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Thanks so much!

Just to make sure I'm clear, you'd recommend a freestanding cantilever design with the posts and beams laid out as you described, and then the joists and rim joists cantilevered over right up to the pool deck as shown below in red?

The decking will sit about 4" or so lower than the existing deck so I'm going to have to think about how to connect the new deck to the existing deck in the best way. The new rim joist could be bolted to the existing deck's rim joist but I'm wondering if there's a better way?
If you had installed the first posts maybe but I would be afraid of one moving and damaging both. I think I would leave it back an inch and put the first deck board just leaving the normal gap to the main deck.
You drew in rim joists at the pool, you just cut the joists so they are close to the pool and cut blocks to go between the joist so you are with in an inch or two from the pool the whole way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay, I was able to get more accurate measurements this evening. Attached are far some additional sketches of the plans with dimensions.

I've attached two framing design options - Option A (what was described above) and Option B for comparison.

The only advantage to Option B that I can see (and frankly the only reason I'm asking) is that the decking on the pool deck will run parallel to the decking on the existing deck, whereas with option a it would run perpendicular. Strength and stability are critical here, and this really of secondary importance. But wondering if I can get the best of both worlds.

It seems to me that ultimately, Option A will provide a much more rigid, stable deck frame. My understanding is that - even with the z brackets and 1/2" lag bolts - there is not nearly the same amount of shear strength with Option B and Option A is certainly the way to go.

Please see attached images...

Am I correct in my understanding here?
 

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Okay, I was able to get more accurate measurements this evening. Attached are far some additional sketches of the plans with dimensions.

I've attached two framing design options - Option A (what was described above) and Option B for comparison.

The only advantage to Option B that I can see (and frankly the only reason I'm asking) is that the decking on the pool deck will run parallel to the decking on the existing deck, whereas with option a it would run perpendicular. Strength and stability are critical here, and this really of secondary importance. But wondering if I can get the best of both worlds.

It seems to me that ultimately, Option A will provide a much more rigid, stable deck frame. My understanding is that - even with the z brackets and 1/2" lag bolts - there is not nearly the same amount of shear strength with Option B and Option A is certainly the way to go.

Please see attached images...

Am I correct in my understanding here?
for stability you can bring the concrete piers right up to beam height .


I have plan C if you trusted the posts on the original deck. Give me a few minutes to draw a picture. They built very strong structure, hard to believe they would cheat on the posts.
 

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I am curious about how you plan to provide a fence or equivalent protection system for the pool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We have a 6' privacy fence up enclosing the whole backyard and a pool alarm.

We may have a latching gate which gives access to the lower level of the deck, or we may towards the side with the pump. Or we may install one of the nicer 4' mesh vinyl fence systems right along the area where the deck meets the edge of the pool, installed into steel posts which will run down through the deck into the ground. That is the ultimate "baby proof" option. (image below)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I like option c but I'm confused about how I would do the beams and where they would connect, since the pool deck sits 6" lower than the existing deck.

I'm guessing attach the joist to existing deck with joist hangers and then run them across the beam that runs over posts #1, #2, and #3?

And what about posts #4 and #5? Where and how would the beams sitting on those attach to the existing deck? (note I've labeled existing deck posts p1-p4)
 

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I like option c but I'm confused about how I would do the beams and where they would connect, since the pool deck sits 6" lower than the existing deck.

I'm guessing attach the joist to existing deck with joist hangers and then run them across the beam that runs over posts #1, #2, and #3?

And what about posts #4 and #5? Where and how would the beams sitting on those attach to the existing deck? (note I've labeled existing deck posts p1-p4)
No I was thinking about hanging beams from your lower beams
 

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