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Discussion Starter #1
I was considering purchasing a tile that is 13 inches by 13 inches and cutting them in half and laying them in a brick work pattern.
(I like the look of rectangle tiles layed in brick work pattern.)

I was wondering if it would look strange with the edge that is cut looking different than the other edge?

Would I be able to sand the sharp edge slightly, or would it not make a difference after I have grouted?


Thanks
 

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This will depend on the edge profile of the tile you buy, but you may be able to match the cut edge with some work. There are also 12x24 tiles which give a nice staggered effect depending on the size of the room or a 3 tile combination for a cobblestone look which gives you more random effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have not bought any tiles yet. The tiles that I have seen that are rectangle in shape are too large.

Bob, it doesn't look bad. My shower was done that way using a limestone tile that was 16 inches X 16 inches and was cut in half and staggered in a brick like fashion, and looks great.

I would like to keep my tile rather small because I have a little dip in the floor for drainage and I don't want too much "lippage?" Is that what its called?

This is why I would rather have a smaller size tile.

I don't like cobblestone look.

If this is not possible I will go back to my basic 12 inch tile, layed in a brickwork fashion.
 

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If you choose tumbled tiles, you can cut them and make the cut edges look "nearly identical" to the factory tumbled edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You are correct Rippy. The tumbled tiles are easier to match, whereas the ceramic tiles have somewhat a "finished edge".

I just thought that it may be an option with ceramic tiles, but I guess I may have to go back to my original 12 X12".
 

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Tileguy
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NOT AN OPTION with glazed ceramic tiles. To say nothing of the glass-like sharp edge you'll be creating. Limestone, travertine, marble, slate, etc. works great but ceramic?:)
 

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NOT AN OPTION with glazed ceramic tiles. To say nothing of the glass-like sharp edge you'll be creating. Limestone, travertine, marble, slate, etc. works great but ceramic?:)
I have simmilar question regarding cutting ceramic tiles - is there no way to make that cut edge look decent?
I'm using new ridgid tile saw with what I think is a good blade. No matter how slow I cut (the slide table is rock solid), I still get tiny chips.

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Tileguy
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There is no way to make the cut edge look the same as the factory edge using ceramic tile.

The chips can be filed away however making the edge look more acceptable. There are rub-stones available. A knife sharpening stone can be use. A diamond file or knife sharpener can be used. Sandpaper works very slowly if it is aluminum oxide, silicone carbide works great but you can't usually find it without special ordering it.:)
 

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Tileguy
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I should probably add that some of today's tiles have a very square edge from the factory unlike others with a pillow-edge from the past. The square edged tile (after being filed) can sometimes look a lot like the factory edge. If you are careful where you put that doctored edge you may get away with it in that case.:)
 

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Bud, - your'e right,
I did a few simple tests and found that I can get the edge to look pretty close to the original with emery cloth, a flat surface and patience. I'm guessing I could put a good belt on my sander and do quite a few if I have to.
Is there a really good blade that doesn't chip the tile when I cut it on the wet saw? The blade I have came with the Ridgid saw and is also made by Ridgid. I have a feeling that they aren't going to provide the best blade on a 450 dollar wet saw.

Jim
 

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Tileguy
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I'm not convinced that in these days you can pay more money and expect to get a better quality blade. I have a helluva time matching diamond blades to porcelain tiles. I have $40 blades and I have $250 blades and it seems I still get stung once in a while. It has more to do with the tile itself than it does the blade I think.

Last week I was installing 18" tile supplied by the customer and I managed to break damned near ever tile I cut. The edges chipped and corners broke off no matter what I did. I tried eight or nine different blades to no avail. Had five floor vents and every one of them suckers fell within the parameters of a full tile. Broke every stinkin' one I tried to cut. Finally gave up and made grout lines where there shouldn't have been any grout lines.:(
 

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WOW - I take it you were plunge cutting those bad boys.
I agree with your assumption about money vs quality. Nowdays it seems like the best advertisers are the winners - quality takes a back seat.

Thanks for getting back.
Jim
 

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Why don't you get rectangular tile instead of going through all that trouble. Maybe hire someone to do the job for you.
 
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