DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
The trick to using a jig saw is good blades. The Bosch t-shanks are hard to beat. Most of the rest stink. Oh yeah, once the good blades get dull, they stink too.

Practice plunge cutting on a piece of scrap. Once you get the hang of it, you'll never drill a starter hole again.
Thanks for the tip. :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,175 Posts
A new fine tooth metal cutting blade will give you a much cleaner cut and will work fine for what you're doing.
 

·
the Musigician
Joined
·
10,404 Posts
If you tape the area with masking tape it'll keep the chipping to a minimum.
Remove tape immediately after cutting.

DM
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,175 Posts
I wish I would have known. Maybe i'll order one now and wait for it. I really wanted to finish this today.
Why would you need to order it?

I live in the middle of nowhere and still have a hardware store close by.
 

·
General Contractor
Joined
·
67 Posts
I would plunge cut with my circular saw without overcutting and finish with my jigsaw. Hand saw will work in place of a jigsaw if you don't have one. And it is harder to make a straight clean cut with a jigsaw than a circular saw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Great choice. To cut your 6" hole, I doubt you would have been happy buying a circular saw...
I own a circular saw. I made about 12 cuts with it today. After all this time owing it, I finally found the sweet spot to line up the blade perfectly. Ive always thought the saw was just messed up but Ive finally got it. :yes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,695 Posts
Both have there place but for the very occasional use I'd go with a jig saw. YOu can cut straigth with a jig saw but it is hard to cut (but not impossible) curves with a circular saw.
 
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top