DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to widen this cutout by approximately 1 inch all around. The granite needs to be cut on both sides and the rear. The brick wall needs to be cut about 1 inch on each side as well to line up with the granite. I have to install this stainless steel shelf.

I think I can handle this job myself by renting a gas powered wet saw from homedepot. However, the largest blade only allows about 5 inches of depth. I suppose the brick does not need to be perfectly straight since the shelf has a lip. How should I go about cutting back the brick?
 

Attachments

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
18,612 Posts
Cutting vertically on the granite will most assuredly result in less than stellar results. If it doesn't fracture right away, chipping out any of it will cause shock cracks and could ruin it all. Can you tell us what you are doing and why you need the extra width?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cutting vertically on the granite will most assuredly result in less than stellar results. If it doesn't fracture right away, chipping out any of it will cause shock cracks and could ruin it all. Can you tell us what you are doing and why you need the extra width?
I need to widen the existing cutout about 1 inch all around to fit that stainless steel jacket I posted a pic of in the first post.

There was propane grill where the cut out was but I'm putting the stainless steel shelf in the cutout to allow the kamado grill to take the place.

Would a circular saw with a diamond blade be a better option for cutting the granite only?
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
63,400 Posts
Would a circular saw with a diamond blade be a better option for cutting the granite only?
This is what I would do with the blade at fill depth and over cut the corner as much as you dare where that cut would be hidden. Or finish the corner cut with the grinder and blade from below.
On the brick you might use a grinder and blade to make several cuts 1' deep so it will chip out easily and clean it up with the grinder.
Rectangle Slope Parallel Font Circle
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
19,386 Posts
Firemen use Diamond Chainsaw to access stone structures.

Maybe get the fire department involved to gain practice with their tool.

Or see if a tool rental place has one for rent.

ED
 

·
Registered
Building my last home
Joined
·
3,900 Posts
Gas powered in my hands and straight line would not be words used in the same paragraph let alone sentence.

I would look into a track saw

This would allow for a 7.25" bladed saw, cut about 3"

Then once the cut is 3" deep you could take an open grinder with a diamond blade and finish it off.

This will take time and money to accomplish. Harbor Freight for blades and for the power tools if this is the only project.

The most important thing,,,, let the blade do the work, dry cutting granite is going to time consuming when you try to do it dry
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
63,400 Posts
Gas powered in my hands and straight line would not be words used in the same paragraph let alone sentence.

I would look into a track saw

This would allow for a 7.25" bladed saw, cut about 3"

Then once the cut is 3" deep you could take an open grinder with a diamond blade and finish it off.

This will take time and money to accomplish. Harbor Freight for blades and for the power tools if this is the only project.

The most important thing,,,, let the blade do the work, dry cutting granite is going to time consuming when you try to do it dry
Just to keep it straight, 7 1/4" blade usually cuts 2 1/4" deep.
An 8 1/4" saw and blade will usually cut 2 3/4" deep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Hey everyone, just an update. Diamond blade with a wet saw made easy work of the granite. No chipping or cracking. The stone was a bit more difficult and had to make several small cuts at different angles and then chip away.

Edit. The weight of the 2 kamados is almost 300lbs. I didn't want all that weight supported by the granite and cutting the brick underneath the sleeve to a perfect height so the sleeve would rest on it while sitting flush with the granite was impossible for me. I used a 1.25"x10"x38" piece of wood with tapcon anchors to secure the wood to the existing brick that sits horizontally above the access doors so the sleeve can rest on it. That took up the gap almost perfect. I used the granite I cut off for a border right under the front section of the sleeve to hide the wood. When the grills were added on top of the sleeve, it seems the weight is distributed somewhat evenly across the base and the granite. To be extra safe, I also used 6"x8" steel L brackets with tapcon anchors to support the rear section of the sleeve since the added wood is only 10" wide.

Another thing, the base of the sleeve is about 1" and hollow. Basically a top and bottom peice of steel and it's thin. I cut off the rivets on one side and slid in 1"x38" pieces of cedar to create a solid base that would not flex. Seems to be working good
 

Attachments

1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top