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Discussion Starter #1
We are removing the inside of the exterior walls in our 1940s 800 sq ft house in order to air seal/insulate the walls. First removed the cheapo paneling in 2 rooms and sheetrock in 2 rooms, now removing (for later use) the original beadboard that was underneath. The problem is, the outlets were installed not originally but as cut ins and with the sheetrock & beadboard gone are just hanging there unattached to the structure. Any ideas of how to attach them to the studs without having to change out the boxes to the kind that nail to the studs? The walls will be insulated and then sheetrocked.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I would replace the boxes.

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Licensed electrician
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If it is in the budget i would look at New circuits and wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The wiring is fine, it is not the original house wiring but is 10 gauge installed for electric baseboard heat probably in the 70s. We got rid of the baseboard heaters 20 years ago and converted it to a grounded outlet in each room. As I'm sure you know it was not fun hooking up that thick wiring to receptacles and if we have to redo them i will probably hire an electrician this round. There is also a junction box in each room where the thermostat used to be so there are 8 boxes that would have to be done.
 

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...We got rid of the baseboard heaters 20 years ago and converted it to a grounded outlet in each room. As I'm sure you know it was not fun hooking up that thick wiring to receptacles and if we have to redo them i will probably hire an electrician this round. There is also a junction box in each room where the thermostat used to be so there are 8 boxes that would have to be done.
A good reason to rip it out and do it correctly then. You can't have more than a 20amp rated circuit for a standard receptacle - it is against code. :vs_no_no_no:
 

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Very Stable Genius
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The wiring is fine, it is not the original house wiring but is 10 gauge installed for electric baseboard heat probably in the 70s. We got rid of the baseboard heaters 20 years ago and converted it to a grounded outlet in each room. As I'm sure you know it was not fun hooking up that thick wiring to receptacles and if we have to redo them i will probably hire an electrician this round. There is also a junction box in each room where the thermostat used to be so there are 8 boxes that would have to be done.
Likely a couple code violations.
Hopefully the breaker was changed to a 15 or 20A as per local code.
Normal receptacles aren't rated to accept #10.
6'/12' rule may not have been followed.

With the walls open, no better time to bring it all up to code.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
When we removed the baseboard heat, the breaker was changed from 240 double breaker to 120 20 amps. I don't understand why there is a problem having 10 gauge wire on a heavy duty receptacle?
 

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Very Stable Genius
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When we removed the baseboard heat, the breaker was changed from 240 double breaker to 120 20 amps. I don't understand why there is a problem having 10 gauge wire on a heavy duty receptacle?
Manufacturers spec their terminations for a size of wire, or, more often,
a range of sizes. Using any device, equipment, etc without following the
specs is a violation and therefore a defect.
Whether the outlets you've used are spec'd for #10 I can't for certain,
only that I think it's unlikely.
 
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