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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Trying to figure out what needs to be done to fix a mess made when we had a bathroom painted recently. We are changing the bathroom to semi-gloss, as flat paint was not holding up well under such humid conditions. Good paint was used, namely SW Duration semi-gloss, in a light subtle color (a very pale and muted blue-green) so that the walls and ceiling could match.

When the job was done, something was obviously wrong. All of the corners are very shiny, and it looks like there are pale stripes where every wall meets another wall or the ceiling. The corners were all cut-in, of course, and the texture of the corners, going out about 1/4 to 1/3 inch on each side of the corner, is completely different from the rest of the walls, which were rolled. The corners are extremely shiny, because the brush strokes were much smoother than the rolled texture. Each corner is so shiny that it looks as if there is a sliver of light shining out of the corner.

I am hoping that we could retexture the thin problem areas in the corners by using a tiny amount of paint on a sponge brush.

I should probably note that there is a large area on the ceiling that has to substantially redone, as it is still covered with random pea-sized bumps that were in the old paint due to humidity. Obviously, the ceiling was not prepared properly and must be redone.

Any chance these issues can be addressed without a full coat of paint (or, heaven forbid, more than one coat)?
 

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The differences in sheen and texture you are seeing are called flashing. Enamel (shiny) paints are especially prone to 'flash' when used on walls.

You won't likely be able to fix it by touching up. In theory one extra complete coat could fix the problem, but that totally depends on the knowledge and skill of the person applying the paint. Using semi-gloss for walls successfully requires more precise techniques than lower sheen or flat paints, as the higher gloss accentuates application inconsistencies.
 

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Glossy paints always require two or three full coats to get the sheen to even out---

Try using a 'hot dog' roller on the edges as you are cutting---get the paint on the edges with your brush--and immediately roll it with the small 6" roller--
 

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This is called picture framing and it's because the brush and roller put on different amounts of paint and a roller leaves a texture called stipple and a brush doesn't.

The fix should be fairly simple get a little 4" roller, they have them almost anywhere that sells paint. Then get the 4" roller cover that has nap on the end. Some just have a button, you don't want those. Just be sure you get the same nap size you used on the wall. Then just roll the corners and this should even everything out.
 

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It's also a situation more unique to Duration and that high of a sheen level. Tip #2 sounds like your issue.
http://www.jackpauhl.com/ten-most-important-facts-about-duration-home/
There was also no need to go all the way up to semi. Duration runs at a higher sheen at all levels. The Matte is almost an eggshell and would of been fine. There would be no need to go above satin, and certainly no need for semi.

What did you repaint over, did you prime before painting over it? You might have to sand, prime and then get different paint. Your thought of sponge and texturing will never work. You might spend more time chasing your tail trying to even it out than trying to give yourself a clean slate to start from.

Also make sure your bathroom has adequate ventilation to begin with. Upgrade your exhaust fan if need be and always let it run for at least 20 minutes after a shower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the Info

Your replies are much appreciated. I think that the little rollers that can get into the corners would work. I have seen painters use those previously, with good results, although that was always done with flat paint, as this is the first bathroom that we have changed to semi-gloss.

I am also finding that there are some areas where the old beige flat paint is definitely showing through in the corners (as in areas that have zero coats of paint, and this is true for some rather large areas of the trim paint, as well). There are way too many issues with this relatively small paint project. I am wondering how to deal with the company that sent out the two men who did such unprofessional work. Although the leader of the team of two said he has been painting for the company for two years, clearly, this is not the work of skillful professional painters. This is a different topic, and I may post a new question on that.
 

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I'm sorry, I must not have read that you paid for this hack job. First step is don't let them touch your walls again. I assumed you did it yourself. I hope you only have paid for materials and not labor. I'd refuse any payment. For a small bath no reason you can't paint it yourself. Would appear you couldn't do worse. Lol. I still say first step is different paint or different sheen. Sand any paint ridges, prime with a stain blocking primer, then get Duration Matte if you want Duration and read the tips from the link I posted. This is my 2 cents.
 
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