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Hey there -

Me and my wife have been working on some property to build our tiny home on. I have had lots of professional help on most everything except the driveway, which I thought would be a pretty simple DIY project. After hand tamping many yards of gravel and a culvert pipe, I thought I was done - but I cannot find what I really need to do for stability when crossing. What do I need to do to make this pile of gravel more permanent? I've read that I can add top soil and tamp more, just having trouble finding out how this is typically done. Thanks so much for any help you can provide.
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Naildriver
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57's are not your friend in a situation like this. Like @mark sr said, larger gravel would be best, and you need a heap more than you have there. Gravel cannot be compacted. Once it is placed or dumped that's it. You can smooth it with a bobcat or shovel, and drive on it immediately.
 

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Usually Confused
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Except for interlocked ones like Neal shows, most around here are fist-sized fieldstone, mainly because it readily available and cheap. You could also go with large crushed(don't know the designation). Soil won't stay.
 

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Plain embankment is used all the time for culverts. No need for a wall.

The stone for the driveway needs to be a well graded. #57 stone is 95-100% smaller than 1"; it's basically a 1/2" stone. You want something with more gradation, like a #68.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Rip er out and start over, that is a failure waiting to happen.

Get an oval Concrete Culvert, 20' longer than your desired driveway width.

I.E. a 20' wide driveway = a 40' long culvert.

A concrete oval culvert that is 18" high X 3' wide would allow water to flow freely,

Place the culvert in slightly tilted with the terrain, flowing downhill.

Then pack in all Crushed gravels, in layers, of 4" thickness.
Tamp between layers, until you get to even with the topside of the gulley.

Have a stockpile of extra crushed gravel nearby, to fill in any voids from driving on it.

Yes more work, but well worth it, the first time you get stuck in there, and discover that your flimsy culvert tube has collapsed, and it needs replaced anyway.

Do it right the first time, and be done with it forever.
 

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Usually Confused
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I have one of those plastic culvert pipes on the entrance to my bottom property - it's worked well for 25 yrs or more. Even had a concrete truck go over it once.
Yes, the municipalities and provincial highways departments up here must be doing it all wrong if plastic is bad. Part of the battle with any culvert is the amount of cover to distribute the load, and OP appears to have lots.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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I have one of those plastic culvert pipes on the entrance to my bottom property - it's worked well for 25 yrs or more. Even had a concrete truck go over it once.

I have had them and the Corrugated steel ones crushed, by no more than a F 250, driving over them.

Even had one taken out by a road maintainer that got too close.

The County was on the hook for that one.

ED
 

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retired painter
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municipalities and provincial highways departments up here must be doing it all wrong if plastic is bad
Locally the county will install free of charge [you supply the pipe] steel and concrete culvert pipes but will not do plastic. Apparently once it's in the ground it becomes the county road crew's responsibility. Biggest issue getting the county to put in the pipe is getting them to do it in a timely manner.
 

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Small #57 gravel will flow and displace when run over by a car. That's why it is a poor material to surround a culvert pipe and to cover it. Dirt is much better. A few inches of gravel is OK beneath the culvert pipe, but you need to surround and cover the culvert pipe with dirt. Same with the road ditch. The gravel should just be a level covering of the last few inches. Start with larger gravel cover, then finish up with smaller stuff like #57.
 

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I have one of those plastic culvert pipes on the entrance to my bottom property - it's worked well for 25 yrs or more. Even had a concrete truck go over it once.
I have had them and the Corrugated steel ones crushed, by no more than a F 250, driving over them.
The amount of cover makes a huge difference. Smooth HDPE or PVC with less than 18" of good crusher run over the top is asking for trouble. Corrugated HDPE or steel with less than 12" is also likely to be get crushed, unless you pour flowable fill (concrete slurry) or concrete from halfway down to about 3" over the top of the pipe.
 
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