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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I've been using this forum as a resource for ages, but finally am taking on a larger project and wanted some feedback around plans to convert a room above the kitchen in our new house into a bathroom and laundry.

It's a 100 year old balloon framed house, and we are already gutting the kitchen. There is no existing plumbing upstairs at this point, so I had planned on running a horizontal stack in the soffit above the future kitchen cabinets perpendicular to the joists. Then the fixture/trap arm would run inside the joist bay to the spot needed.

I had planned on using a wye in a horizontal, long sweep 90 up to a san-tee, which would then provide the trap arm for the tub and shower (shorter stretches upper left of drawing). This would also service a long arm for the toilet, which would have a wet-vent going off to the vanity (vent would run into ceiling and re-join others)

Above each of the san-tee I will likely need a quick 45 or 22.5 jog to get into the framing space with the 2" vents, which would then merge in the attic before going out as a single vent.

My biggest concerns are: is long-sweep 90 ok in this orientation, or should I really be doing 2x 45s? Side by side they look identical as far as size and snake-ability when using a short piece in between the 2 45s. I would prefer not to lengthen that as it pushes the soffit down and limits cabinet space below…

As I know a lot of flack can go flying around DIY, permits, etc: I have a permit, I am working with an inspector who is super helpful, but he is also super busy, and I would prefer to vet a few things here instead of making an ass out of myself to him. I appreciate any and all feedback, and would be happy to answer any questions.
 

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Welcome to DIY Chatroom. Good to see that you stopped lurking and decided to join :wink2:

2-45 will equal a long turn 90, so either is fine. I'll go one further and say that a medium 90 in the instance you show is allowed with my inspectors- but check with yours before going with a medium 90.

You should be allowed to vent the tub and shower with 1.5"- I noticed you mentioned 2"

What code are you plumbing with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome and notes!

A medium 90 would be great to save some in both dimensions, it's tight getting the shower and toilet line in the same joist bay with the long sweep. I'll make a note to check on that.

Another question I thought of...does the wye for wet venting the toilet need to be turned up? I know a dry vent needs it, couldn't remember if wet. Flat would be preferred for home drilling and alignment with the wall being built above it.

Everything is IBC 2009 for the most part minus a few specific adoptions and exemptions.
 

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2-45 will equal a long turn 90, so either is fine. I'll go one further and say that a medium 90 in the instance you show is allowed with my inspectors- but check with yours before going with a medium 90.
Our last inspector told us he would allow the use of a vent 90 for a dirty armed lavatory drain. 0_o

Just goes to show you the difference from inspector to inspector. They all have one particular pet peeve that they constantly hammer on, and other things that they let fly.

We've never done that before, never done it since, and he doesn't work for the county anymore. :biggrin2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One last question I thought of...if wet venting the toilet through the vanity, there is no need for a venter where it joins the horizontal run, correct? That will help save a lot on 3" fittings when the drop is so crucial for that run anyhow.
 
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