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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a 2 family home, and the previous owner installed a tub that creaks when you're showering. Apparently this is caused by not having the proper (or any) support underneath it, and will slowly lead to cracks and eventual failure.

I have access to the tub from the basement through a 6" hole cut in the subfloor for the drain. Additionally, I was going to replace the floor (yes, FLOOR - vinyl floor in the bathroom) so I don't care to rip that up and see if I could sneak something underneath from the side.

Is it possible to fix this properly with the tub still installed, or should I be looking at removing the tub to fix this? The surrounding wall is also drop in, so I can't just remove a few tiles to pick this up.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Most all fiberglass tubs have Styrofoam support rails adhered to the underside when new.

Over time the foam breaks down and stops supporting the tub, causing creaking first, then cracks, then holes.

You might spray some GREAT STUFF foam under it that will last until you decide on a full gut and remodel of your room.


ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Most all fiberglass tubs have Styrofoam support rails adhered to the underside when new.

Over time the foam breaks down and stops supporting the tub, causing creaking first, then cracks, then holes.

You might spray some GREAT STUFF foam under it that will last until you decide on a full gut and remodel of your room.


ED
The only thing stopping me from using Great Stuff is it?s an open cellular foam that?s not meant to support. There?s some 5lb closed cell foam I?ve found, but that?d be tough to spray
 

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Never ever going to happen.
Installing that unit was a one shot deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Never ever going to happen.
Installing that unit was a one shot deal.
I?m realizing that now as I research more - removal is basically ?sawzall till it?s out?

I actually have access to 3 sides and underneath so I can easily make holes and stuff some plaster of Paris. My question now is if stuffing plaster of Paris afterwards would work or if it is worth it vs just rip and replacing the tub? This will eventually be a rental unit and want to make sure it?s secure for not just me but for future tenants.
 

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retired framer
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I have gone in from behind and was able to get a couple stacks of plywood chunks under the center. It was still good 10 years later when I sold the house.
 

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Hey Walk, Here's my story. About 10/15 years ago I had a fiberglass shower doing the same thing. I knew it was a matter of time before you know what. I had access underneath it with a big diameter hole for the drain. I heard many stories about how to repair it. I used expandable foam and shoved the foam hose as far under as I could and sprayed a full can. Yes it expanded but as long as there's an opening for it to expand to you should be good. I haven't heard one cracking noise since and there have been some heavyweight's on it. Take my advise and foam it.. Ask yourself what's the worst that can happen? You have to replace it. So try this first. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey Walk, Here's my story. About 10/15 years ago I had a fiberglass shower doing the same thing. I knew it was a matter of time before you know what. I had access underneath it with a big diameter hole for the drain. I heard many stories about how to repair it. I used expandable foam and shoved the foam hose as far under as I could and sprayed a full can. Yes it expanded but as long as there's an opening for it to expand to you should be good. I haven't heard one cracking noise since and there have been some heavyweight's on it. Take my advise and foam it.. Ask yourself what's the worst that can happen? You have to replace it. So try this first. Good luck.
Thanks I'm feeling a bit better about the foam here, although I do like the wood idea as well from Nealtw. If I can find an expanding foam that can take weight support I'll feel great. This is a home that'll eventually be a rental home while I live off site, so peace of mind goes a long way for me here.
 

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Thanks I'm feeling a bit better about the foam here, although I do like the wood idea as well from Nealtw. If I can find an expanding foam that can take weight support I'll feel great. This is a home that'll eventually be a rental home while I live off site, so peace of mind goes a long way for me here.
I Agree wood is good but foam is better. Wood difficult to cover the entire underneath, difficult to try to wedge it in the exact right spot, has to be chimed properly and even. Foam goes in all spots and fills all low & high spots evenly and strong. Ever get a TV or electrical appliance encased in Styrofoam? Well that is what the end result is under the tub with spray. Good luck . Out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also, here is the creaking I'm talking about. I'm trying to find a leak from the front of the tub as well, but panned the camera to underneath the tub.

You can see the crappy supports there, and the prior installation clearly thought "hey wow, this is clearly going to support a 175lb+ person"

Creaking is because someone was showering in there at the time

 
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