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i am getting my home ready to sell and have a one inch crack on the floor of my fiberglass bathtub that i used caulk years ago to fill. i am considering a glue on tub inlay kit to cover the floor of the tub so i dont have to replace the tub and shower. would gluing that mat down allow my unit to pass a home inspection.i have included some text from the kit i am considering buying....thank you Paul

16 in. W x 40 in. L Bathtub Floor Repair Inlay Kit
Fix your cracked and leaky, chipped or unattractive bathtub floor with the NuTub 16 in. W x 40 in. L Bathtub Floor Repair Inlay Kit. A cracked, leaky bathtub isn't just unsightly - it's a liability. Water seeps through the cracks, collecting on the floor below. The result can be structural damage and worse yet, mold. Mold can be a serious health concern. The NuTub 16 in. W x 40 in. L Bathtub Floor Repair Inlay Kit is a permanent and easy solution designed for a DIY installation. No special tools or skills are required. It takes about an hour to install. The kit includes a flexible inlay, specifically designed to cover cracks and hide damage to the tub floor. The strong waterproof adhesive permanently binds the inlay to your tub floor. When properly installed, the inlay is better than your original tub floor. The NuTub 16 in. W x 40 in. L Bathtub Floor Repair Inlay Kit will work on any bathtub including fiberglass, acrylic, porcelain, cast iron, pressed steel enamel and plastic. The inlay's built in anti-slip texture also helps prevent serious falls in the bathtub, which according to the CDC is the biggest cause of accidental injuries in the home.
Tough, yet flexible thermoplastic design gives long lasting structural support to cracked and damaged bathtub floors
Strong, waterproof adhesive provides a permanent repair for cracked and leaking tub floors
Built in anti-slip feature helps prevent serious falls in the bathtub
Works on any type of bathtub including fiberglass, acrylic, porcelain, cast iron, pressed steel enamel and plastic
Installation is easy and fast - no special tools or skills are required
Includes: inlay, adhesive, an adhesive spreader and gloves, sand paper and easy to follow directions
 

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Naildriver
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No matter what you do, you will have to disclose it to potential buyers.
 
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Instead of a potential black eye, make it a selling point, remember you are selling a very expensive house.

Install the patch and then disclose it along with an allowance to cover a complete repair. The tub is functional for now and they have the good (honest) gesture that allows them to combine the replacement with perhaps other changes. Whatever the cost you are buying goodwill by being honest and THAT is worth far more than a tub repair.

People buying a home are often expecting some concessions on price, this offer covers one and perhaps makes them happy.

Bud
 
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Discussion Starter #5
thank you for the advice and i agree that if a full replacement isnt done that an honest disclosure will be the action i take. actually I was wrong, the tub is made of acryllic/plastic . i believe i will start another post asking suggestions for repairing a cracked shower floor
 

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Hammered Thumb
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Why do you need to disclose a repair? Do you need to disclose a roofing repair? Sealant in concrete cracks? Why not the nail holes you filled in the drywall? This is not a life safety issue that disclosures specify.

Your house doesn't "pass/fail" inspection. A buyer either decides there is too much to repair, and walks, or goes back to you and asks for it to be repaired or money for them to repair it.
 

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Some states have home sale disclosure laws. If the seller does not disclose the seller could end up paying all future cost of repairs after they go to court.
 

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retired framer
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You may not have to declare a repair that has been done but if you hide and a home inspector finds it, you have created doubt. People only hire and an inspection after they have decided to buy, hopefully the inspection finds nothing the buyer has not already seen.


I always go the other way, take pictures of stages of a repair, usually structure so an inspector can look at pictures and say yes that was done right. With a bath tub, you want him to say yes it is repaired but it will be just fine until the next remodel.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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Some states have home sale disclosure laws. If the seller does not disclose the seller could end up paying all future cost of repairs after they go to court.
Yes, for lead, asbestos, subsidence, current infestation, material defects in systems, etc that you are aware of. You do not have to disclose each and every little repair you have ever made.

A homeowner is free to make repairs however they want while they live there. A future potential owner can accept or decline how repairs were done via monetary value. OP is not hiding or doing anything wrong, he can either patch it with that product, remodel the bath, or leave it as is.
 

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Not necessary to “reveal” anything to the buyer since you’re not hiding anything. You are merely making a repair. And no “good faith” allowance necessary either. Because it is right there in plain sight for anyone, home buyer, inspector, or guest using the bathroom. It is a simple stick-on liner that does not “disappear”.

Ron
 

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You made the right decision to replace the tube because it has a big influence on buyers. When they see something broken, they want a good discount on the price. I had some similar situations and I don't want to repeat them. Moreover, when I sold the houses, I take the Building Inspection Perth because they make a good inspection of the house and after that, they told me all the problems which they encountered. And I decide to replace some of them, but it all depends on if it is significative problem or not.
 

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Yes, for lead, asbestos, subsidence, current infestation, material defects in systems, etc that you are aware of. You do not have to disclose each and every little repair you have ever made.

A homeowner is free to make repairs however they want while they live there. A future potential owner can accept or decline how repairs were done via monetary value. OP is not hiding or doing anything wrong, he can either patch it with that product, remodel the bath, or leave it as is.
The law on this topic is well-developed in Ohio. Under Layman v. Binns and Traverse v. Long, the Ohio Supreme Court has clearly adopted the doctrine of caveat emptor, or “buyer beware.” The Court has pronounced that buyers have no cause of action against a seller unless either (a) the defect was not discoverable upon a reasonable inspection and the seller knew about the defect or (b) the seller took steps to actively conceal or lie about the defect.
So, the Layman standard sets up a difficult factual challenge: a plaintiff must show that the damages were not reasonably discoverable by him on inspection, but on the other hand, as of the time of the litigation, the problems are so great that (a) the seller certainly knew about them and (b) they deserve significant recompense by the Court. This is a vexing problem for every property defects plaintiff, commercial or residential.
Since he has posted to a public board he would need to disclose the defect.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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Since he has posted to a public board he would need to disclose the defect.
It is not a defect. Well, it was, then he repaired the tub. Not a life safety issue.
Your door hinge is pulling away. You install a longer screw, and it works. Two years later under a new owner, the screw again pulls out. Did the seller have to disclose the screw they installed 2 years ago?
 

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It is not a defect. Well, it was, then he repaired the tub. Not a life safety issue.
Your door hinge is pulling away. You install a longer screw, and it works. Two years later under a new owner, the screw again pulls out. Did the seller have to disclose the screw they installed 2 years ago?
Caulking an acrylic tub is hardly a proper repair.
He's replacing the thing so it's a non matter.
 
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