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Hey all.....this is my first time I am posting to the website. Just signed up and I hope I can get some tips from someone with the problem I am having right now.

I just ripped out the fiberglass shower in my master bath and I'm going to replace with tile. Upon removal of the fiberglass shower I noticed the water lines were CPVC with brass elbows and T-Fittings and they had a black ring/clamp around the CPVC where it attached the fitting. In talking with a buddy of mine that is a plumber, he said you need a special tool for that. I want to re-route the lines myself through the studs so I don't have to wait on him or pay someone else to do it. The lines free hang on the outside of the stud and I need to re-route them through the studs so I can get the cement board flat against the studs to screw in. My question to anyone that can help is what "special" tool(s) do I need, how easy is this to do, what do I need to look out for, ect...

I am very new at DIY home repair/remodeling. If you could basically dumb it down to almost kindergarten information, I would greatly appreciate it.

Jason
 

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I don't understand why such fittings were used. They have to be a lot more expensive than CPVC fittings. I would cut them out and replace them with CPVC. It isn't that hard to do. Any basic how-to plumbing book will explain how it's done.
 

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OK.....I found it out it was PEX pipes. The black ring was the crimp ring. I plan on tackling the movement of the pipes tonight.....a buddy let me borrow his tools. Wish me luck.

Jason
 

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I have never used it, but have heard PEX is pretty easy to work with. You shouldn't have any trouble if you have the right tools.
 

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Pex is not that hard to work with as long as your buddy gave you the gauge needed to check that your connection is correct. It is a gauge (simply a piece of flat metal with a series of half holes cut out at the edge). It will indicate by placing your crimped joint into the end of the metal gauge whether or not you have a good joint. I suggest you use one since this is your first time crimping pex. You should also make sure you are aware that pex expands more than copper and so needs a little more room to do just that. Also there are proper clips to hold it in place ie. along side a joist as well as ones for when you go through wood it is there to protect the plastic so it does not rub a hole into it. Hope that helps.
 

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Thanks guys. I did it last night and it wasn't bad at all. No leaks when the water was turned back on and I got the clips to hold it in place. Seems to be working fine. Off to tackle the membrane, cement board and shower base.
 
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