DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I plan on building a covered rear patio. I have included my sketchup. The dimensions are going to be 19' wide x 17' depth. I planned on attaching to the house the ledger roughly 14' high because that is where the brick ends\siding starts and the second floor begins. For my header beam, I am not sure what to use for the 19' span between my two 10' 6"x6" posts. I don't know how to go about looking up what is recommended by code. Also should the rafters be 16" on center?

Thanks for any advice you can give!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,975 Posts
Assume:

2 x 8 Rafters at 16 inch c/c
Post spacing of 17 ft c/c (inside the edge of the slab)
Max post height 12 ft

Requires a 4 x 12 Beam

PDF attached. Note that the information MAY be outdated. Published in 2004.

Consult your local AHJ to confirm information.
 

Attachments

·
I have gas!
Joined
·
2,326 Posts
You'll need an engineer to give you the spec's for it... Luckily, many lumberyards know how to use the software to give you the beam specifications and it's free. Just do the courtesy of buying the materials from them.
 

·
Civil Engineer
Joined
·
5,832 Posts
You should discuss your project with the local building inspector. Your inspector should be able to point out which section of your code is applicable to the sizing of the header. Your code may not have a prescriptive section for a 19 foot header, you may need to design the header based on code mandated loading, which would include snow, wind, and dead load. Your local lumberyard (not a big box store, an actual lumberyard) may be able to size the header for you, assuming you purchase a glulam or similar type of beam from them. In many cases they have an on call engineer who can size the beam, and they roll the design cost into the price of the beam.

A few other things to consider. You are probably going to need diagonal bracing between the posts to resist sway. You may need hurricane clips or similar to keep the roof attached to the framing in high winds. Your building inspector should be able to help you understand the requirements, and should be able to point out a section in the code to help you size the footings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guys for your quick responses. I really appreciate the help! With spring approaching I want to get this project underway.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top