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Just changed the kitchen faucet. This is the third faucet I've removed in the house, and I must have repressed the memory of the last two and how awful removing 15 year old faucets under a sink is. Not sure how plumbers do it under there. Got messy but a drill and a chisel finally worked.

Anyway, after I connected the water supply lines, I noticed in the instructions it said to hand tighten and then use a wrench for a quarter turn. My hand tightening barely got it connected, and the I used the wrench for several full turns probably. I never used much force, but then got worried that I may have overtightened. Would I know if I did? Any reason to check or loosen them?

Also, one of my shut off valves need some encouraging with the pliers to turn. Once it was unstuck it went back and forth fine. Both clearly had some green patina from age. I didn't have the time to drive out to try and replace them, but they are both turning OK now. Any reason they would need to be changed ASAP? Or as long as they are moving they are OK? They clearly shut off the water, since it wasn't flowing when everything was disconnected.

Thanks!
 

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I like to use a basin wrench when changing faucets. Perfect for getting in tight places. Hand tightened then snug up with wrench all that is needed.

In regards to supply shut off valves; they will no doubt need to be replaced at some point. When you do get the quarter turn ones. Better than those gate type imo. for now, spray some wd 40 on them and work them a bit. just a suggestion.
 

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Sometimes it helps to remember we are now installing products that are from a foreign market that has very little quality control and that can make for more difficulty.

When i install globe valves, being i'm a DIY'er, i take the time to disassemble the new valve and lube every part that turns, threads, slides, moves or looks as if it may someday may need to move or may have have a crud build up as you experienced. Then when the valve is turned off I can feel when the neoprene washer on the stem end touches the seat and stop turning rather than crunching it down tight and screwing up a brand new valve from the get go. Consider dissembling your old valves and lubing. If i'm forced to replace a valve i do as jmon suggests and in goes a Brasscraft ball valve.


3 minute EDIt: EDIT: Here' a tip on our new products like you discovered. Test attach supply lines etc. and any other possible before crawling on our hands and knees to get under the sink.
 

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Yup, just had to deal with this for a bathroom I'm remodeling. Those valve have rubber bits that get brittle and compressed over the years and need replacement. You really only need to replace the two rubber bits in the pic above.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the help! I tried the basin wrench, but just couldn't get it on the old nut. It was round with the hex part standing proud off of it, but the hex part was so shallow and such a tight area that I just couldn't get a grip on it.

Here is a pic of one of the shut off valves. To replace, do I just disconnect the little stem that's coming off the nut up against the wall (the place where the green stuff is)? Sorry for the bad pic, tough to get a good shot down there. You can't really see the hose connection which is on the opposite side.

This next one is a dumb question but I haven't done it in years... What's the best way to shut off all the water? We have a well, and I think I've shut off the breaker for the pump when we needed to cut off the water, but wouldn't the water from the hot water heater still flow then? Do I also need to cut off the the pipes running into/out of the water heater? There are two there each with a quarter turn valve that were installed a few years back with the new heater. But I can't find or remember if there's another master water cut-off somewhere.

Thanks again!!
 

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If you've shut down all supply to the house, open the lowest faucets (hot and cold) you can. Hopefully you do have some that are lower than the ones you're fooling with. This should drain any water still in the system so you don't have it coming out the ones in question. If those are the lowest, you'll just have to drain them into a bucket.

Looks like you have a compression valve. Get two wrenches; pipe or crescent, and use one to hold in place the nut that's closest to the wall. Use the other on the hexagonal part of the valve body and turn it counterclockwise. Get ready for a little drippage, even if you've drained the pipes.
 
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